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I want to update a large number of C++ source files with an extra include directive before any existing #includes. For this sort of task I normally use a small bash script with sed to re-write the file.

How do I get sed to replace just the first occurrence of a string in a file rather than replacing the every occurrence?

If I use

sed s/#include/#include "newfile.h"\n#include/

it replaces all #includes.

Alternative suggestions to achieve the same thing are also welcome.

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17 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted
     # sed script to change "foo" to "bar" only on the first occurrence
     1{x;s/^/first/;x;}
     1,/foo/{x;/first/s///;x;s/foo/bar/;}
     #---end of script---

or if you prefer

sed '0,/RE/s//to_that/' file 

Source

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that's an awful lot of swapping hold and pattern spaces... –  mitchnull Sep 29 '08 at 12:42
25  
I think I prefer the 'or if you prefer' solution. It would also be good to explain the answers - and to make the answer address the question directly, and then generalize, rather than generalize only. But good answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '08 at 13:15
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -si '/#include/{s//& "newfile.h\n&/;:a;$!{n;ba}}' file1 file2 file....

or if memory is not a problem:

sed -si ':a;$!{N;ba};s/#include/& "newfile.h\n&/' file1 file2 file...
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Write a sed script that will only replace the first occurrence of "Apple" by "Banana"

Example Input: Output:

     Apple       Banana
     Orange      Orange
     Apple       Apple

This is the simple script:

0,/Apple/{s/Apple/Banana/}
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1  
I like this the best so far. The cleanest. –  dalore Mar 28 '12 at 21:06
8  
translated into human language: start at line 0, continue until you match 'Apple', execute the substitution in curly brackets. cfr: grymoire.com/Unix/Sed.html#uh-29 –  mariotomo Jun 25 '13 at 7:46
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The following command removes the first occurrence of a string, within a file. It removes the empty line too. It is presented on an xml file, but it would work with any file.

Useful if you work with xml files and you want to remove a tag. In this example it removes the first occurrence of the "isTag" tag.

Command:

sed -e 0,/'<isTag>false<\/isTag>'/{s/'<isTag>false<\/isTag>'//}  -e 's/ *$//' -e  '/^$/d'  source.txt > output.txt

Source file (source.txt)

<xml>
    <testdata>
        <canUseUpdate>true</canUseUpdate>
        <isTag>false</isTag>
        <moduleLocations>
            <module>esa_jee6</module>
            <isTag>false</isTag>
        </moduleLocations>
        <node>
            <isTag>false</isTag>
        </node>
    </testdata>
</xml>

Result file (output.txt)

<xml>
    <testdata>
        <canUseUpdate>true</canUseUpdate>
        <moduleLocations>
            <module>esa_jee6</module>
            <isTag>false</isTag>
        </moduleLocations>
        <node>
            <isTag>false</isTag>
        </node>
    </testdata>
</xml>

ps: it didn't work for me on Solaris SunOS 5.10 (quite old), but it works on Linux 2.6, sed version 4.1.5

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Quite a comprehensive collection of answers on linuxtopia sed FAQ. It also highlights that some answers people provided won't work with non-GNU version of sed, eg

sed '0,/RE/s//to_that/' file

in non-GNU version will have to be

sed -e '1s/RE/to_that/;t' -e '1,/RE/s//to_that/'
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Using FreeBSD ed and avoid ed's "no match" error in case there is no include statement in a file to be processed:

teststr='
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
'

# using FreeBSD ed
# to avoid ed's "no match" error, see
# *emphasized text*http://codesnippets.joyent.com/posts/show/11917 
cat <<-'EOF' | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ *$//' | ed -s <(echo "$teststr")
   H
   ,g/# *include/u\
   u\
   i\
   #include "newfile.h"\
   .
   ,p
   q
EOF
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sed -e 'bb; :a q; :b s/^#include/#include "fname.h"\n#include/; ta' test.txt
  • bb; — branch to the b mark (skipping the quit command);
  • :a q;a mark with the quit command;
  • :b s/from/intob mark with substitution;
  • ta — jump to a mark if substitution is successful;
  • ; — command delimiter in sed.
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sed '0,/pattern/s/pattern/replacement/' filename

this worked for me.

example

sed '0,/<Menu>/s/<Menu>/<Menu><Menu>Sub menu<\/Menu>/' try.txt > abc.txt
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sed has a very simple syntax for this, '-i' is interactive (no need for newfile). To replace only the first instance:

sed -i 's/foo/bar/' file

to replace globally you would use

sed -i 's/foo/bar/g' file

In your example I would use (^ and $ are begin and end of line respectively)

sed -i 's/^#include/#include\n#include/' file
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3  
sed -i 's/foo/bar/' file replaces the first instance of foo on every line; not for the entire file. –  kristi Jun 7 '12 at 1:52
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I finally got this to work in a Bash script used to insert a unique timestamp in each item in an RSS feed:

        sed "1,/====RSSpermalink====/s/====RSSpermalink====/${nowms}/" \
            production-feed2.xml.tmp2 > production-feed2.xml.tmp.$counter

It changes the first occurrence only.

${nowms} is the time in milliseconds set by a Perl script, $counter is a counter used for loop control within the script, \ allows the command to be continued on the next line.

The file is read in and stdout is redirected to a work file.

The way I understand it, 1,/====RSSpermalink====/ tells sed when to stop by setting a range limitation, and then s/====RSSpermalink====/${nowms}/ is the familiar sed command to replace the first string with the second.

In my case I put the command in double quotation marks becauase I am using it in a Bash script with variables.

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As an alternative suggestion you may want to look at the ed command.

man 1 ed

teststr='
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
'

# for in-place file editing use "ed -s file" and replace ",p" with "w"
# cf. http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/howto/edit-ed
cat <<-'EOF' | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ *$//' | ed -s <(echo "$teststr")
   H
   /# *include/i
   #include "newfile.h"
   .
   ,p
   q
EOF
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i would do this with an awk script:

BEGIN {i=0}
(i==0) && /#include/ {print "#include \"newfile.h\""; i=1}
{print $0}    
END {}

then run it with awk:

awk -f awkscript headerfile.h > headerfilenew.h

might be sloppy, I'm new to this.

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A possible solution:

    /#include/!{p;d;}
    i\
    #include "newfile.h"
    :
    n
    b

Explanation:

  • read lines until we find the #include, print these lines then start new cycle
  • insert the new include line
  • enter a loop that just reads lines (by default sed will also print these lines), we won't get back to the first part of the script from here
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sed is all about editing lines of text, not files.

I would use another tool like awk/Perl.

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3  
And what, pray tell, is a text file but a series of lines of text? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '08 at 13:20
2  
Obviously a text file is a stream of characters delimited by newlines. I just think that awk is a better tool for the type of problem the person posting the question asked. –  duffbeer703 Sep 30 '08 at 4:57
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You could use awk to do something similar..

awk '/#include/ && !done { print "#include \"newfile.h\""; done=1;}; 1;' file.c

Explanation:

/#include/ && !done

Runs the action statement between {} when the line matches "#include" and we haven't already processed it.

{print "#include \"newfile.h\""; done=1;}

This prints #include "newfile.h", we need to escape the quotes. Then we set the done variable to 1, so we don't add more includes.

1;

This means "print out the line" - an empty action defaults to print $0, which prints out the whole line. A one liner and easier to understand than sed IMO :-)

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This answer is more portable than the sed solutions, which rely on gnu sed etc.. (e.g. sed in OS-X sucks!) –  Jay Taylor Nov 23 '11 at 19:09
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#!/bin/sed -f
1,/^#include/ {
    /^#include/i\
#include "newfile.h"
}

How this script works: For lines between 1 and the first #include (after line 1), if the line starts with #include, then prepend the specified line.

However, if the first #include is in line 1, then both line 1 and the next subsequent #include will have the line prepended. If you are using GNU sed, it has an extension where 0,/^#include/ (instead of 1,) will do the right thing.

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+1 for mentioning that 0 is a GNU extension. –  Paul Wagland Mar 22 '13 at 10:01
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Just add the number of occurrence at the end:

sed s/#include/#include "newfile.h"\n#include/1
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1  
Unfortunately, this does not work. It replaces the just first occurrence on each line of the file and not the first occurrence in the file. –  David Dibben Sep 29 '08 at 12:32
    
Additionally, it is a GNU sed extension, not a standard sed feature. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '08 at 13:19
    
This answer helped in my case - thanks –  tttppp Nov 16 '09 at 9:49
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