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I have the following extension methods:

public static IQueryable<Employee> WhereStatus(this IQueryable<Employee> queryable, string status)
{
    var result = queryable
        .Where(e => e.EmployeeStatus.Where(s => s.StatusEndDate == null).Select(s => s.Status)
        .FirstOrDefault() == status);

    return result;
}

public static IQueryable<Employee> WhereCostCenter(this IQueryable<Employee> queryable, int costCenterID)
{
    var result = queryable
        .Where(e => e.CostCenterID ==  costCenterID);
    return result;
}

I need these extension methods almost in every single LINQ query to filter the query to certain employees depending on few parameters (for example: status, cost center, gender...etc). Right now I am using it like this:

using (DB db = new DB())
{
      var emps = from em in db.Employees
                 .WhereStatus("Active")
                 .WhereCostCenter(112)
                 select em.EmpID;

      var courses = from cr in db.Courses
                    where c.Contains(cr.EmpID)
                    select cr;

      // now I have the filtered list of the courses I want
      .....
}

Question: Is that the best practice? or is there a way to make the extension method works with all entity types I have since all entities have an EmpID? something like:

var courses = from em in db.Courses
              .WhereStatus("Active")    // use the extension methods directly here as well
              .WhereCostCenter(112)
              select cr;
share|improve this question
    
I think your code would be more readable if you didn't use the extension methods at all. –  John Saunders Feb 13 '13 at 2:21
    
@JohnSaunders the code above is just a sample, the filtering methods are more complicated than this. I use the same filtering in almost every single LINQ query. I can not keep writing the same code over and over again... –  user915331 Feb 13 '13 at 2:22
    
Also remember that Where(predicate).FirstOrDefault() you always can/should replace with FirstOrDefault(predicate). Same for First, Single, SingleOrDefault. –  abatishchev Feb 13 '13 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that not all of the entities will have the properties necessary to use all of the extension methods. What you can do is create subsets of the properties, and place them into interfaces.

Example:

public interface IHaveCostCenterID
{
    public int CostCenterID {get; set;}
}

public partial class Employee : IHaveCostCenterID
{
}

public partial class Department : IHaveCostCenterID
{
}

public static IQueryable<IHaveCostCenterID> WhereCostCenter(this IQueryable<IHaveCostCenterID> queryable, int costCenterID)
{
    var result = queryable
        .Where(e => e.CostCenterID ==  costCenterID);
    return result;
}

Another way:

public static class Extension
{
    public static IQueryable<TEntity> WhereCostCenter<TEntity>(
        this IQueryable<TEntity> queryable, int costCenterID)
        where TEntity : IHaveCostCenterID
    {
        var result =
            queryable.Where(e => e.CostCenterID == costCenterID);
        return result;
    }
}

public interface IHaveCostCenterID
{
    int CostCenterID { get; set; }
}

public partial class Employee : IHaveCostCenterID
{
    public int CostCenterID { get; set; }
}

public partial class Department : IHaveCostCenterID
{
    public int CostCenterID { get; set; }
}

This can be a solution to use of generic methods to extract common code, and not just for LINQ. You can do this whenever you have two (or more) pieces of code which are identical except that they happen to use different classes. Extract the common part into interfaces, and have the generic method use an interface constraint.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, is this a good practice? I need to use the filtering methods everywhere.. is it the best practice around? –  user915331 Feb 13 '13 at 2:28
    
It's the best practice I know of. –  John Saunders Feb 13 '13 at 2:33

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