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I have the following query

select distinct name from table1
intersect
select distinct name from table2;

I load the resultset into a cursor in a PL/SQL procedure, like so:

cursor c1 is (select distinct name from table1
intersect
select distinct name from table2);

For some reason the last value in the resultset is duplicated in the cursor. This does not happen when running the query by itself. Any ideas why this is happening?

Code for the loop:

var table.col%type;

BEGIN
OPEN c1;
LOOP    
BEGIN
  exit when c1%NOTFOUND; 
  FETCH c1 into var;       
  INSERT INTO table values (col1, var);
  commit;   
EXCEPTION
 WHEN DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX THEN         
 CONTINUE;  
 END;
END LOOP;    
END;
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it is a SQL set operation that selects only the common elements from two different SELECT statements –  user2001117 Feb 13 '13 at 4:06
3  
How are you looping on the cursor? can you show us some code ? –  A.B.Cade Feb 13 '13 at 5:11
    
Looping code added to the question. When I query the table that the data is being inserted to after I run the procedure the last value is inserted twice. –  sotn Feb 13 '13 at 9:30
2  
Shouldn't he exit when be after the fetch clause? –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 13 '13 at 9:45
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EXIT WHEN .. clause should come after FETCH.

Let's say, your cursor had 10 records to return. Before the first fetch is fired, %NOTFOUND evaluated to NULL, and the processing moves to the next statement, which is FETCH in your case. Now, if we fast forward to the 10th iteration, FETCH will get the 10th record, and the same is inserted into your destination table. The loop will move ahead, and since your EXIT WHEN %NOTFOUND is before fetch, it still has the value from last iteration, and it lets the control move ahead, and there, fetch will not be able to get any record, but the code will anyhow insert the last row it retrieved in 10th iteration. Now in the next loop, c1%NOTFOUND will be evaluated to TRUE and the loop will terminate

var table.col%type;

BEGIN
OPEN c1;
LOOP    
BEGIN

FETCH c1 into var;    
exit when c1%NOTFOUND;    
INSERT INTO table values (col1, var);
commit;   
EXCEPTION
WHEN DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX THEN         
CONTINUE;  
END;
END LOOP;    
END;
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add comment

This is typical of the problems you see with explicit cursors.

Your first choice should be a single SQL statement, nothing more.

If you had to use a cursor, you should be using an implicit one wherever possible.

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1  
-1 this is not a problem with explicit cursors, it's because of the way the explicit cursor is used. Agreed with the sentiment "first choice should be a single SQL statement" though. –  Jeffrey Kemp Feb 14 '13 at 1:44
    
Any technique can be used well or poorly, Jeffrey, and explicit cursors are no exception. In comparison to implicit cursors they require more logic, more code, they're in many cases slower and they're always more prone to coding errors. Even a well-written explicit cursor is generally slower and inferior to an implicit cursor. asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… –  David Aldridge Feb 14 '13 at 8:42
    
I've no argument with that; but your post is not an answer to the question ("why is this happening"), it would be more appropriate as a comment. –  Jeffrey Kemp Feb 15 '13 at 2:49
    
There's no clear practice on that, and my observation is that it varies with different subject area respondents treating it differently. The practice on the better Oracle sites is to provide a solution to the problem, and definitely not guidance on exactly where to aim when shooting yourself in the foot, possibly because Oracle practitioners are so very prone to it. –  David Aldridge Feb 15 '13 at 8:16
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