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I have a class in Sinatra where I set some settings (from JSON, as it happens):

class Pavo < Sinatra::Base
  configure :development do
    set :config, JSON.parse(File.open(File.dirname(__FILE__) + "/pavo.configuration.development.json", "rb").read)
    set :config_mtime, File.mtime(File.dirname(__FILE__) + "/pavo.configuration.development.json")
  end

  [...]

  get '/' do
    puts "whatever"
  end
end

And that class has a model, that is required to read those settings.

class Resolver < Sinatra::Base
  def get_data(workpid)
    url_str = settings.config['public']['BOOKS_DATA_SERVICE_URL'].gsub('${WORKPID}', workpid)
    return Resolver.get_json(url_str)
  end
  [...]
end

However, the Resolver class can't do it: undefined method `config' for Resolver:Class.

Maybe I have the wrong scope, or I should be using Sinatra::Application?

share|improve this question
    
Is there some reason Resolver is a separate application? –  iain Feb 13 '13 at 3:51
    
You can't access settings from a different class. Your settings are stored in Pavo, you can't access those settings from Resolver. You should move the methods in Resolver to Pavo if you want access to settings. –  Casper Feb 13 '13 at 4:14
    
@Casper But it doesn't make sense to keep the entire application in the one class... –  Huw Feb 14 '13 at 0:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you get a class to inherit from Sinatra::Base you are making that a Sinatra application. Each application gets its own settings object. If you want to share settings across applications you have some options:

  1. Merge the applications.
  2. Make the settings more globally accessible.

Merging them is easy (unless there's some particular reason we're not aware of), you basically put them in the same class.

To make the settings more globally accessible, I'd do the following:

a) Wrap the entire application in a module to namespace it.
b) Put the settings you want to use in a class instance variable accessible via a "getter" method.

e.g.

module MyNamespace

  def self.global_settings
    @gs ||= # load your settings
  end

  class App < Sinatra::Base
    configure do
      set :something_from_the_global, MyNamespace.global_settings.something
    end
  end

  class SecondaryApp < Sinatra::Base
    helpers do
      def another_method
        MyNamespace.global_settings.something_else # available anywhere
      end
    end
    configure do # they're also available here, since you set them up before the app
      set :something_from_the_global, MyNamespace.global_settings.something
    end
  end

end

That's fine if you've got some very small apps, but if you're using multiple apps then you'll want to separate things out a bit. The way I tend to organise an app is remove everything from the rackup file (usually config.ru) that does anything, aside from requires and run. I put the middleware and app setup in another file, usually app/config.rb so I know it's the stuff from the config.ru. Then each application gets its own file (e.g. app/app.rb, app/secondary.rb)

# app/config.rb

require "app"
require "secondary"

module MyNamespace
  # set up your getters… e.g.

  def self.global_settings
    @gs ||= # load your settings
  end

  def self.app
    Rack::Builder.app do

      # …and middleware here
      use SecondaryApp
      run App
    end
  end
end

# config.ru

require 'rubygems'
require 'bundler'
Bundler.require

root = File.expand_path File.dirname(__FILE__)
require File.join( root , "./app/config.rb" )

map "/" do
  run MyNamespace.app
end

There are a lot of benefits to this kind of set up - it's easier to test; it's easier to organise; you can move apps around easier. But YMMV as always.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @iain, I'll give it a go this afternoon and let you know. –  Huw Feb 14 '13 at 2:27

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