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I'm parsing through a text file formatted like below

> alpha
apple
airplane
art
> beta
bear
blue
beat
> charlie
cow
cent
coat

I'm trying to find entries (alpha beta charlie) that has a motif (e.g. "ta"). If the motif is found, then I'm trying to print out the words underneath each entry (bear blue beat). So in this example, I'd like the following output

> beta
bear
blue
beat

I've figured out how to print the entry line, but no idea how to print out the lines underneath. Any ideas would be much appreciated.

my $motif = "ta";
my $file = "file.pl";
open(INPUT, $file) or die "Can't open file.\n";
parse($motif);

sub parse{
    my ($x) = (@_);
    while(<INPUT>){
        if($_ =~ />*($x)/){
            print $_."\n";
#       if($_ !~ />/){
#           print $_."\n";
        }else{
            next;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
So you want to print every line that does not start with ">", correct? –  Jack Maney Feb 13 '13 at 3:48
    
@JackManey I'd like to print the line that starts with > as well as the words after that > that has the match. I've edited my original post with clarification. –  user1854603 Feb 13 '13 at 3:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, you need to keep loop state. The match triggers a "print" state, and a mismatch detriggers it. So you have something like this?

sub parse {
  my ($x) = (@_);
  my $printable = 0

  while (<INPUT>) {
    if ($_ =~ /^>.*($x)/) {
      print $_;
      $printable = 1;
    } elsif ($_ =~ /^>/) {
      $printable = 0;
    } elsif ($printable) {
      print $_;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Appreciate the explanation. I've never seen anything like this before, so it's a new revelation. Thank you! –  user1854603 Feb 13 '13 at 4:04

Here's another option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $motif = pop;
local $/ = '>';    # record separator

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    print $/ . $_ if /(?<=\x20).*?$motif/;
}

Usage: perl script.pl data.txt 'ta'

Output on your data in data.txt:

> beta
bear
blue
beat

The notation local $/ = '>' sets the record separator to > instead of the usual \n, so each > marks the start of a record that's read. The line your searching has a space immediately after the >, and that's what the positive look-behind (?<=\x20) attempts to match.

You can redirect output to a file by doing the following: perl script.pl data.txt 'ta' >output.txt.

share|improve this answer

Basically, you can use a variable ($print_flag) to see if you should be printing the line. It's set to 1 (which is evaluated as true) if you get the match that you want and 0 if you match a line that starts with ">" but that doesn't contain $motif.

Try this (warning: untested):

use strict;    #Always!
use warnings;  #Always!
my $motif = "ta";
my $file = "file.pl";
open(my $input,"<", $file) or die $!; #two argument open: bad!
parse($motif);

sub parse{
    my ($x) = (@_);
    my $print_flag = 0;
    while(<$input>){

        chomp; #removes trailing EOL character
        if(/^>.*($x)/)   #Don't need $_
        {    
            $print_flag = 1;
        }
        elsif(/^>/)
        {
            $print_flag = 0;
        }

        if($print_flag)
        {
            print "$_\n";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So it's a like a switch. Haven't seen something like this, but thank you for the clarification! Big revelation to me. –  user1854603 Feb 13 '13 at 4:03

This type of problem seems like a natural for the Perl range operator (more commonly known, in this context, as the "flip-flop" operator). However, the details of your requirements ended up making it a little more complex than I'd expected:

#!/usr/bin/env perl    

use strict;
use warnings;

parse('ta');

sub parse {
  my $pattern = shift;

  my $seq;
  while (<DATA>) {
    if ($seq = /^>.*$pattern/ ... (/^>/ && !/^>.*$pattern/)) {
      print unless $seq =~ /E0$/;
    }
  }
}


__DATA__
> alpha
apple
airplane
art
> beta
bear
blue
beat
> charlie
cow
cent
coat

Output:

> beta
bear
blue
beat
share|improve this answer

If it is always the same number of lines following the match (three) then this hackish "match countdown" idiom would work:

 perl -ne '$m=4 if (/^>s/ ); print if ($m-->0);'

We use "4" in order to match the line plus the number of lines following it (3), then we countdown with $m-- as we proceed to print. I use $m to mimic a similar option in the shell's grep. However I'm actually not certain if this is an idiom or what its accepted name would be if it is the case. Probably the flip-flop range ... approach is preferable or more widely used in script - but here is a self-contained script to try using the more hackish approach.

Pass in the number of lines and the pattern to search as arguments:

#!perl
use v5.16; # strict & warnings

my $linesafter ; 
my $num = shift ;                                                              
my $pat = shift ;                                                              

while (<DATA>) {                                                               
  $linesafter = $num if ( /^> $pat/ );                                         
  print if ($linesafter-->0); 
}                                                                              

__DATA__                                                                       
> alpha                                                                        
apple                                                                         
airplane                                                                     
art                                                                           
> beta                                                                         
bear                                                                           
blue                                                                          
beat                                                                          
> charlie                                                                     
cow                                                                           
cent                                                                        
coat    
share|improve this answer

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