Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a custom built parser, because I really dislike the way the default java.util.Scanner works.

My problem is that when I create the parser using new Parser("Parsed phrase here") or the function reloadBuffer("Parsed phrase here") it misses the last word of the input. I tried to make this code as readable as I could, but it's still pretty dense, sorry for that. Oh, and if this ever gets fixed, feel free to use it.

import java.util.*;

public class Parser
{

    public static char letters[] = new char[]{'q','w','e','r','t','y','u','i','o','p','a','s','d','f','g','h','j','k','l','z','x','c','v','b','n','m','Q','W','E','R','T','Y','U','I','O','P','A','S','D','F','G','H','J','K','L','Z','X','C','V','B','N','M'};
    public static char numbers[] = new char[]{'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'};

    public ArrayList<String> words;
    public String buffer;
    public int wordIndex;
    /**
     * Assembles an empty parser.
     */
    public Parser()
    {
        words = new ArrayList<String>();
        buffer = "";
        wordIndex = 0;
    }
    /**
     * Assembles the Parser with given String as input. Uses reloadBuffer();
     * @see reloadBuffer
     */
    public Parser(String input)
    {
        words = new ArrayList<String>();
        reloadBuffer(input);
    }
    /**
     * Parses each word/set of chars into the array. Must be called before any retreiving of words can be done. 
     * This is basically the core function of the class. Be very careful if you edit this part.
     */
    public void parseBuffer(){
        String input = buffer;
        while(input.length()>=1)
        {
            input = trimToSelectedChars(input);
            words.add(removeFirstSet(input)[0]);
            input = removeFirstSet(input)[1];
        }
    }
    /**
     * Resets the array with given String as input. Used in the primary constructor. Uses parseBuffer();
     * @see parseBuffer()
     */
    public void reloadBuffer(String input){
        buffer = input;
        wordIndex = 0;
        parseBuffer();
    }

    /**
     * @return the next word parsed from the string, based upon the value of wordIndex.
     */
    public String next(){
        wordIndex++;
        if (wordIndex<= words.size()+1){
            try {return words.get(wordIndex-1);
            } catch(Exception ex) {
                System.err.println("Error: reached end of list. Resetting index to 0.");
                resetIndex();
            }
        }
        return "";
    }

    //Notice that when using wordAt(), it leaves the index where you selected, and it does not revert to where it was before.
    /**
     * @return the word at indicated index, much like the charAt() function, using the next() function. Also sets wordIndex to input index.
     * @see String
     * @see next()
     */
    public String wordAt(int index){
        wordIndex = index;
        return next();
    }

    /**
     * @return the first word parsed from the input.
     * @see String
     */
    public String firstWord()

    {
        return wordAt(0);
    }

    /**
     *Be careful in using lastWord() as it sets the wordIndex to the last value which will return a String
     *@return the last parsed word from the input.
     */
    public String lastWord(){
        return wordAt(words.size()-1);
    }

    /**
     * Resets the wordIndex to 0, the beginning.
     */
    public void resetIndex(){wordIndex = 0;}

    /**
     * return whether or not there is another word in the parser list.
     */
    public boolean hasNext(){
        return (wordIndex<words.size());
    }
    //internal methods here.
    private String[] removeFirstSet(String input)
    //removes the first set of adjecent letters from a string, and returns it.
    {
        String[] words = new String[2];
        int index = 0;
        if(input.length()<1) words[0] = "";
        while(index<input.length()){
            //this loop to retrieve the first word.
            if(isLetter(input.charAt(index))||isNumber(input.charAt(index))){
                index++; //if the first char is a letter, move on to the next one.
            }
            else{
                words[0]=input.substring(0,index);
                words[1]=input.substring(index);
                return words;
            }
        }
        return new String[]{"",""};
    }

    private String trimToSelectedChars(String input)
    //trims anything that is not a letter from the front of a String.
    {
        input = input.trim();
        while(input.length()>0){
            //this loop to clear up junk before the input.
            if(isLetter(input.charAt(0))||isNumber(input.charAt(0))){
                break; //if the first char is a letter or a number, break the loop
            }
            else input=input.substring(1);// else cut the first char off the string.
        }
        return input;
    }

    private boolean isLetter(char c)
    //returns whether or not the indicated char is an alphabetical letter.
    {
        for(int i = 0; i<letters.length; i++){
            if(letters[i]==c)return true;
        }
        return(false);
    }

    private boolean isNumber(char c)
    //returns whether or not the indicated char is a number.
    {
        for(int i = 0; i<numbers.length; i++){
            if(numbers[i]==c)return true;
        }
        return(false);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
One, learn to use Scanner properly, it's a very standard class and I doubt the problems you have with it are due to poor design on the library's part. –  djechlin Feb 13 '13 at 4:38
1  
This looks like a bad idea to me. First, there must be at least a couple of dozen options out there for parsing a string into a list of words. Further, you're creating a collection-like class that's neither a Collection nor Iterable, which seriously impedes its usefulness. Unless there's something really unique and useful buried in here somewhere, it looks like a future maintenance headache for no real benefit. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 13 '13 at 4:38
1  
Two, "debug my code" is too localized and not a legitimate question here. –  djechlin Feb 13 '13 at 4:39
    
Why cant you just use String[] words = input.split("\\s+"); –  Jayamohan Feb 13 '13 at 5:01
add comment

closed as too broad by Daniel Lyons, djechlin, Paul Bellora, Beryllium, Sean Owen Mar 2 at 15:16

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

replace the method removeFirstSet with the following one

private String[] removeFirstSet(String input)
    //removes the first set of adjecent letters from a string, and returns it.
    {
        String[] words = new String[2];
        int index = 0;
        if(input.length()<1) words[0] = "";
        while(index<input.length()){
            //this loop to retrieve the first word.
            if( isLetter(input.charAt(index))||isNumber(input.charAt(index))){
                index++; //if the first char is a letter, move on to the next one.
            }
            else{ 
                words[0]=input.substring(0,index);
                words[1]=input.substring(index);
                return words;
            }
        }
        if(index==input.length()){
             words[0]=input.substring(0,index);
             words[1]=input.substring(index);
             return words;
        }
        return new String[]{"",""};
    }

Hope this will solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.