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I am pretty proficient with coding, but now and then I come across code that seems to do basically the same thing. My main question here is, why would you use .append() rather then .after() or vice verses?

I have been looking and cannot seem to find a clear definition of the differences between the two and when to use them and when not to.

What are the benefits of one over the other and also why would i use one rather then the other?? Can someone please explain this to me?

var txt = $('#' + id + ' span:first').html();
$('#' + id + ' a.append').live('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#' + id + ' .innerDiv').append(txt);
});
$('#' + id + ' a.prepend').live('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#' + id + ' .innerDiv').prepend(txt);
});
$('#' + id + ' a.after').live('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#' + id + ' .innerDiv').after(txt);
});
$('#' + id + ' a.before').live('click', function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#' + id + ' .innerDiv').before(txt);
});
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1  
i never use append which (use to?) bugs ie, i use appendTo that seems alsomore correct semantically especially since there's after (chain chain chain) - nb: after is after not within –  mikakun Feb 13 '13 at 4:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 80 down vote accepted

See :


.append() puts data inside an element at last index and
.prepend() puts the prepending elem at first index


suppose:

<div class='a'> //<---you want div c to append in this
  <div class='b'>b</div>
</div>

when .append() executes it will look like this:

$('.a').append($('.c'));

after execution:

<div class='a'> //<---you want div c to append in this
  <div class='b'>b</div>
  <div class='c'>c</div>
</div>

Fiddle with .append() in execution.


when .prepend() executes it will look like this:

$('.a').prepend($('.c'));

after execution:

<div class='a'> //<---you want div c to append in this
  <div class='c'>c</div>
  <div class='b'>b</div>
</div>

Fiddle with .prepend() in execution.


.after() puts the element after the element
.before() puts the element before the element


using after:

$('.a').after($('.c'));

after execution:

<div class='a'>
  <div class='b'>b</div>
</div>
<div class='c'>c</div> //<----this will be placed here

Fiddle with .after() in execution.


using before:

$('.a').before($('.c'));

after execution:

<div class='c'>c</div> //<----this will be placed here
<div class='a'>
  <div class='b'>b</div>
</div>

Fiddle with .before() in execution.


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+1 If you could add some code samples for each of the examples you explained, that would make this answer complete. E.g. in this case, which will be added before which? $item1.before($item2); $item2.before($item1); –  Joraid Feb 27 at 8:06
    
@joraid updated the answer as per your comment with some js fiddle links in execution. –  Jai Apr 2 at 10:43
    
@downvoter this is really amazing after 53 upvotes why this answer get a downvote without any comment. –  Jai Apr 2 at 10:44

append() & prepend() are for inserting content inside an element (making the content its child) while after() & before() insert content outside an element (making the content its sibling).

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The best way is going to documentation.

.append() vs .after()

  • .append(): Insert content, specified by the parameter, to the end of each element in the set of matched elements.
  • .after(): Insert content, specified by the parameter, after each element in the set of matched elements.

.prepend() vs .before()

  • prepend(): Insert content, specified by the parameter, to the beginning of each element in the set of matched elements.
  • .before(): nsert content, specified by the parameter, before each element in the set of matched elements.
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There is a basic difference between .append() and .after() and .prepend() and .before().

.append() adds the parameter element inside the selector element's tag at the very end whereas the .after() adds the parameter element after the element's tag.

The vice-versa is for .prepend() and .before().

Fiddle

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+1 Great fiddle! –  Steve Feb 8 at 13:59

Imagine the DOM (HTML page) as a tree right. The HTML elements are the nodes of this tree.

The append() adds a new node to the child of the node you called it on.

Example:$("#mydiv").append("<p>Hello there</p>") 

creates a child node <p> to <div>

The after() adds a new node as a sibling or at the same level or child to the parent of the node you called it on.

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There is no extra advantage for each of them. It totally depends on your scenario. Code below shows their difference.

    Before inserts your html here
<div id="mainTabsDiv">
    Prepend inserts your html here
    <div id="homeTabDiv">
        <span>
            Home
        </span>
    </div>
    <div id="aboutUsTabDiv">
        <span>
            About Us
        </span>
    </div>
    <div id="contactUsTabDiv">
        <span>
            Contact Us
        </span>
    </div>
    Append inserts your html here
</div>
After inserts your html here
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To try and answer your main question:

why would you use .append() rather then .after() or vice verses?

When you are manipulating the DOM with jquery the methods you use depend on the result you want and a frequent use is to replace content.

In replacing content you want to .remove() the content and replace it with new content. If you .remove() the existing tag and then try to use .append() it won't work because the tag itself has been removed, whereas if you use .after(), the new content if added 'outside' the tag and isn't affected by the previous .remove().

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