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I'm trying to create a sort of wrapper class that forwards all operators to its contained object, to try and make it able to "pretend" to be the contained object. The code I'd like to write looks something like this (simplified):

template<typename T>
class Wrapper
{
private:
    T val;
public:
    Wrapper(T value) : val(value) {}
    auto operator++() -> decltype(++this->val)
    {
        return ++this->val;
    }
};

This works fine with an int, but if I try to pass a std::string into it, I get the error cannot increment value of type 'std::basic_string<char>'.

I also tried using declval here, but that only made things worse, as not only did it still throw errors on std::string, it also threw them on int in that case due to int not being a class.

Now, in normal situations, this function wouldn't be generated at all because I'm not calling it. But, for whatever reason, the decltype is still being processed on this function even though it isn't being generated at all. (If I remove the decltype and change the return type to void, I can compile with std::string with no problem.)

So my question is: is there any way I can get around this? Maybe some crazy trick using SFINAE? Or, is it possible this is improper behavior for the compiler in the first place, since the function isn't generating code?

EDIT: Solution, modified somewhat from the solution suggested by BЈовић:

//Class, supports operator++, get its declared return type
template<typename R, bool IsObj = boost::is_class<R>::value, bool hasOp = boost::has_pre_increment<R>::value> struct OpRet
{
    typedef decltype(++std::declval<R>()) Ret;
};
//Not a class, but supports operator++, return type is R (i.e., ++int returns int)
template<typename R> struct OpRet<R, false, true>
{
    typedef R Ret;
};
//Doesn't support operator++, return type is void
template<typename R> struct OpRet<R, true, false>
{
    typedef void Ret;
};
template<typename R> struct OpRet<R, false, false>
{
    typedef void Ret;
};

template<typename T>
class Wrapper
{
private:
    T val;
public:
    Wrapper(T value) : val(value) {}
    auto operator++() -> typename OpRet<T>::Ret
    {
        return ++val;
    }
};

This will work with both simple and class types, and for class types, will also work in situations where the return type of operator++ is not R (which is probably very rare for operator++, but worth taking into account for the sake of maximum compatibility.)

share|improve this question
    
If it didn't process all method declarations, how could it know when it needs to instantiate a method definition? – Kevin Ballard Feb 13 '13 at 4:44
    
My assumption is that it wouldn't check the paramters of decltype until it actually starts generating code for that method. Why would it need to? Just wasting cycles getting information it isn't going to use. – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 4:46
    
What's the point of this wrapper? Why not just expose the member publically? – Pubby Feb 13 '13 at 4:47
    
What do you return if you make the operator return void? – JaredC Feb 13 '13 at 4:50
    
@Pubby: Maybe this code is a simple repro for the error. We encourage people to NOT show us how complicated things are. – Ben Voigt Feb 13 '13 at 4:51
up vote 2 down vote accepted

is there any way I can get around this?

You can use boost::has_pre_increment and SFINAE :

#include <string>
#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>


template<typename R,bool hasOp = boost::has_pre_increment<R>::value > struct OpRet
{
  typedef R Ret;
};
template<typename R> struct OpRet<R,false>
{
  typedef void Ret;
};


template<typename T>
class Wrapper
{
private:
    T val;
public:
    Wrapper(T value) : val(value) {}
    auto operator++() -> typename OpRet<T>::Ret
    {
        return ++val;
    }
};

int main()
{
  Wrapper<std::string> a("abc");
  Wrapper<int> b(2);
}

is it possible this is improper behavior for the compiler in the first place, since the function isn't generating code?

No. The compiler issues proper diagnostic. The std::string really has no prefix increment operator. [temp.deduct] 7 and 8 are clear about this :

7:

The substitution occurs in all types and expressions that are used in the function type and in template parameter declarations. The expressions include not only constant expressions such as those that appear in array bounds or as nontype template arguments but also general expressions (i.e., non-constant expressions) inside sizeof, decltype, and other contexts that allow non-constant expressions. [ Note: The equivalent substitution in exception specifications is done only when the function is instantiated, at which point a program is ill-formed if the substitution results in an invalid type or expression. — end note ]

8:

If a substitution results in an invalid type or expression, type deduction fails. ...

share|improve this answer
    
A little more verbose than I was hoping for, and I was also hoping to avoid relying on boost for this, but this works, so thank you. :) – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 15:58
    
Ah... but this always returns a value of type T. So it won't work if, for whatever reason, this is used with a class that implements operator++ with a different return type than itself, which was the reason for the decltype expression. – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 16:02
    
But, with a couple of modifications, this is what I needed. I put my modifications in the question. – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 16:20
    
@ZávadaLaCroix Instead of putting answer in your question, answer your own question. And accept that instead – BЈовић Feb 13 '13 at 16:46
    
But it's your answer, so I wanted to give you credit for it! I only tweaked it slightly. 95% of it is still yours. – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 19:39

You indeed want SFINAE. operator++ needs to be made a function template for that, and a good trick is to use a default argument for the template parameter to turn T into a dependent type (this is necessary for SFINAE to apply).

template<typename U = T>
auto operator++() -> decltype(++std::declval<U&>())
{
    return ++this->val;
}

As you may notice however, we lose the convenience of using the member directly, and we need a bit of thinking to figure out what exactly we should feed to std::declval to get the value category and cv-qualifiers right.

share|improve this answer
1  
This works with class types, but doesn't work with simple types, like int, because int can't be used as a template argument for declval. – Závada LaCroix Feb 13 '13 at 15:49
    
@ZávadaLaCroix This isn't true at all. The implementation you're using might have a defect. In which case you can try to substitute your own by declaring: template<typename T> typename std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type declval() noexcept;. – Luc Danton Feb 14 '13 at 10:13

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