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Im writing a program to transpose a given matrix using allocated memory. The function works perfect with square matrix nxn (rows==cols) but it crashes with mxn matrix (rows != cols). Please help

void transpose(int **matrix, int *row, int *col)
{
    // dynamically allocate an array
    int **result;
    result = new int *[*col]; //creates a new array of pointers to int objects
    // check for error
    if (result == NULL)
    {
        cout << "Error allocating array";
        exit(1);
    }
    for (int count = 0; count < *col; count++)
    {
        *(result + count) = new int[*row];
    }

    // transposing
    for (int i = 0; i<*row; i++)
    {
       for (int j = i+1; j<*col; j++)
       {
        int temp = *(*(matrix + i) + j);
        *(*(matrix + i) + j) = *(*(matrix + j) + i);
        *(*(matrix + j) + i) = temp;
       }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i<*row; i++)
    {
       for (int j = 0; j<*col; j++)
       {
          *(*(result + i) + j) = *(*(matrix + i) + j);
          cout << *(*(result + i) + j) << "\t";
       }
       cout << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
new throws an exception on failure. Use new(nothrow) if you want it to return null on failure (although it's unusual to want that). –  Peter Wood Feb 13 '13 at 8:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The lines:

for (int i = 0; i<*row; i++)
{
   for (int j = i+1; j<*col; j++)
   {
    int temp = *(*(matrix + i) + j);
    *(*(matrix + i) + j) = *(*(matrix + j) + i);
    *(*(matrix + j) + i) = temp;
   }
}

are the issue. The problem is that matrix is indexed by i then j, not j then i like you are doing in the second and third line in the while loop. Image that matrix is a 2x3 matrix, then you try to perform matrix[2][3] = matrix[3][2], but matrix[3][2] does not exist.

It is best to go about simply initializing result directly in this loop:

for (int i = 0; i<*row; i++)
   for (int j = 0; j<*col; j++)
     result[j][i] = matrix[i][j];

Then you can output like below, or delete matrix and reassign matrix to be result as you wish. My entire transpose function became the following code (row and col need not be pointers to int pass by value is just fine. Also accessing matrices should use array subscripts as it is nicer style):

void transpose(int **matrix, int row, int col)
{
  // dynamically allocate an array
  int **result;
  result = new int *[col]; //creates a new array of pointers to int objects
  for (int i = 0; i < col; i++)
    result[i] = new int[row];

  // transposing
  for (int i = 0; i<row; i++)
   for (int j = 0; j<col; j++)
     result[j][i] = matrix[i][j];

  //output resulting matrix
  for (int i = 0; i<col; i++) {
   for (int j = 0; j<row; j++)
    cout << result[i][j] << "\t";
   cout << endl;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i tried but then got some ugly numbers :( –  Casper Feb 13 '13 at 6:05
    
was it from your output statements? cause you need to make sure those loops similarly index result, instead of *row by *col those should be *col by *row –  pippin1289 Feb 13 '13 at 6:18
    
I added my entire transpose function which I tested –  pippin1289 Feb 13 '13 at 6:35
    
thank you so much –  Casper Feb 13 '13 at 6:47
1  
@pippin1289 do not forget to delete allocated memory –  borisbn Feb 13 '13 at 6:54

You are trying to transpose matrix "in place" :

((matrix + i) + j) = ((matrix + j) + i);

you shouldn't do this. If count of columns is greater then count of rows, allocated for matrix, you'll read and write non-allocated memory.

IMHO, It would be better to store whole matrix in continuous memory. Not in different pieces. In this manner the code would look like this:

void transpose( int *matrix, int row, int col )
{
    for ( int i = 0; i < row; i++ )
    {
       for ( int j = i + 1; j < col; j++ )
       {
           int temp = matrix[ i * col + j ];
           matrix[ i * col + j ] = matrix[ j * col + i ];
           matrix[ j * col + i ] = temp;
       }
    }
}

The only minus of this allocation, that you can't address an element like matrix[ i ][ j ] but only matrix[ i + col + j ]. Pluses are: 1) easy to allocate/deallocate memory (just matrix = new int[ col * row ] and delete [] matrix) 2) a little bit faster access to elements (because of continuous location of them)

At the end, I think, that it would be the best way to look at std::vector. If you want, I can show you, how will you function look with vector

share|improve this answer
    
yea thanks for your input, i have been told many times that using vector is much better but for this problem im required to use this concept :( –  Casper Feb 13 '13 at 6:09

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