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I have a templated class and want to access a public static variable from outside it, but I can't figure out any way to do so without instantiating the template. This code:

template<class T>
class TemplatedClass {
    public:
        static const int static_member = 10;
};

...

int i = TemplatedClass::static_member;

Produces the following error: "'template class TemplatedClass' used without template parameters."

If I instantiate the class when accessing the variable:

int i = TemplatedClass<int>::static_member;

The error goes away. I would prefer not to have to instantiate a template in a context where it doesn't really make sense with a dummy type argument just to suppress an error. If I have to, what would be the best dummy type to use? I tried <> and <void>, but neither worked.

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2  
Each instantiation is a new type, so it doesn't make sense not to provide a type. –  chris Feb 13 '13 at 5:44
    
I am afraid you have to. But you use other instantiations of the template in other places anyway, no? Using one more, of the same type as in other places, shouldn't be a problem? –  jogojapan Feb 13 '13 at 5:45
    
Another way to say is that a template on itself is strictly not a type. And so we cannot access static members which should be, loosely speaking, members of a type (specifically a class). –  Mark Garcia Feb 13 '13 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can't be done, since specializations might override the value, i.e:

template<class T>
class TemplatedClass : public BaseClass
{
    static const int value = 42;
};

template<>
class TemplatedClass<StarTrek>
{
    static const int value = 47;
}

Thus you will get different values:

TemplatedClass<StarTrek>::value != TemplatedClass<void>::value      

If the values are to be equal, I strongly suggest you add a non-template base class:

class BaseClass {
public:
    static const int value = 42;
};

template<class T>
class TemplatedClass : public BaseClass
{
    ...
}

Instantiating or explicitly a dummy type (i.e. void) might work, but you might get compile errors depending on how you use your template parameter.

int x = TemplatedClass<void>::value;

So, please write code which show your intentions clearly, i.e. common values for all instantiations should not be in the type-dependent template class. If you can't have that, please explain what you're trying to do in more detail.

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Thanks. Is there any preferred dummy type to use for this sort of thing? –  programmer Feb 13 '13 at 5:48
    
void is the universal dummy type, but you might want to make your own to document stuff properly. However, I seriously recommend that you rethink your design. –  Macke Feb 14 '13 at 7:10

Using a dummy type might work for trivial classes, but not if things get more complex.

Let's imagine, that your class "continues" like this:

template<class T>
class TemplatedClass {
public:
    static const int static_member = 10;
    typedef typename std::enable_if< std::is_integral< T >::value >::type type;
};

This code tells us that T cannot be non-integral type.

Upd (thanks to jogojapan): That's why in some cases you cannot use any type as a dummy one

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How does this answer the question? –  jogojapan Feb 13 '13 at 5:55
1  
@jogojapan I'm apologise... Yes, it's not an answer, but an invitation to thinking that in some cases we can't pass any type as dummy type. I'll edit an answer, but if you'll tell that it's still doesn't have a sense, I'll delete it –  borisbn Feb 13 '13 at 6:44

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