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I was doing some some Java homework with my friend. The instructor wants him to write a Java program to translate an integer input into a numeric grade. 100-90 = A and so on. The only catch is that he must use a switch statement. He must also:

Include a case in your switch statement that will display a polite error message if the user enters any number less than 0 or greater than 100."

Originally I thought of this...

import java.util.Scanner;
public class grade
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int ng;//number grade
        String lg = "";//letter grade

        System.out.println("enter grade");

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

        ng = in.nextInt();

        switch (ng/10) 
        {
            case 10: 
            case 9:     
                lg = "A";  
                break;
            case 8:
                lg = "B";  
            break;
            case 7:     
                lg = "C";  
            break;
            case 6:     
                lg = "D";  
            break;
            default:     
                lg = "F";  
            break;
        }   
         System.out.println("You got an " + lg);
      }
}

This isn't perfect because it allows values over 100 and below 0, but I am trying to avoid typing out every integer from 100-0. This seems like a ridiculous use of a switch statement and I can't imagine why a college professor would teach it, other than to illustrate the DRY principle.

Is there a better way that still uses the switch statement, but doesn't type every int from 100-0?

share|improve this question
1  
Your method seems fine. Why not just wrap the switch in an if statement that checks to see if ng >= 0 && ng <= 100? –  Jake King Feb 13 '13 at 5:50
    
I would but the requirement is to put the test inside the switch statement. I know it's dumb. –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 5:51
1  
The point of using the switch statement is so that the student can LEARN how the switch statement works ... and some tricks to make it work better (like your range reduction trick). This example might seem ridiculous to you ... but that is entirely beside the point. –  Stephen C Feb 13 '13 at 5:58
    
@StephenC Wouldn't it be best to teach the student to recognise the proper tool for the job? If I was teaching someone to use a hammer I would have them make a cup of tea just so they get the experience of holding the hammer. But you're right, it is beside the point –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 6:02
    
The other thing is that you need to be careful that you are helping him .. rather than (effectively) doing his homework for him. Aside from the ethics, consider the point of the exercise is for him to learn practical programming skills. He will learn them better if he gets to do all of the work. Also, consider that all of your learned advice on DRY principles, the best way to do XYZ, etc will go straight in one ear and out of the other if he is still struggling with the basics of Java statements. –  Stephen C Feb 13 '13 at 6:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could always add some minor complexity to your switch expression to make the cases simpler; this will calculate 90-100 as 10, 80-89 as 9 and so on, 101 and above will become 11 and above, and every input below 0 will become 0 or negative so they'll fall under default;

switch ((ng-ng/100+10)/10)
{
    case 10:
        lg = "A";
        break;
    case 9:
        lg = "B";
        break;
    case 8:
        lg = "C";
        break;
    case 7:
        lg = "D";
        break;
    case 6: case 5: case 4: 
    case 3: case 2: case 1:
        lg = "F";
        break;
    default:
        System.out.println("Polite Error");
        lg = "";
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for. It seems like the best way to make this disgusting exercise a tiny bit more palatable. –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 7:21
    
@shakabra Yes, it shrinks the code a bit and takes away a bit of extra error checking. It will require an extra comment or two though, since the expression isn't entirely straight forward. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 13 '13 at 7:30

Yeah, no way in hell you would want to actually use a switch statement for this lol. But the way you've suggested is about the best way I can think of to do it.

I would make the default be for the error scenario though, because that could any integer less than 0 or over 100. Between 0 and 100, at least you have a finite number of cases (though you'll have to repeat the "F" case several times).

share|improve this answer

Nice use of integer division ;)

Okay, well this code officially embarrasses me and makes me cry. But here, just using switch statements.

import java.util.Scanner;
public class grade
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int ng;//number grade
        String lg = "";//letter grade
        boolean error = false;

        System.out.println("enter grade");

        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

        ng = in.nextInt();

        switch (ng/10) 
        {
            case 10: 
                switch (ng)
                {
                     case 100:
                         lg = "A";
                         break;
                     default:
                         error = false;
                         break;
                }
                break;
            case 9:     
                lg = "A";  
                break;
            case 8:
                lg = "B";  
            break;
            case 7:     
                lg = "C";  
            break;
            case 6:     
                lg = "D";  
            break;
            case 5:     
            case 4:     
            case 3:     
            case 2:     
            case 1:     
            case 0:     
                lg = "F";  
                break;
            default:     
                error = true;
            break;
        }   

         if (error) {
           System.out.println("Sorry, the grade must be between 0 and 100");
         } else {
           System.out.println("You got an " + lg);
         }
      }
}

Blech.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no reason to have all those separate cases for 0-5 with their own break statement. –  Brian Roach Feb 13 '13 at 5:56
    
True, quick copy and paste. –  Cody A. Ray Feb 13 '13 at 5:58
    
Oh dear lord. That's disgusting. But it may be the best way under the constraints. –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 6:03
    
@shakabra You'll want to test with -1 as a value. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 13 '13 at 6:14

How about:

String lg = null;
switch (ng/10) 
{
    case 10:
        if (ng > 100) {
            // polite error
            break;
        }
    case 9:
        lg = "A"
        break;
    case 8:
        lg = "B";  
        break;
    case 7:     
        lg = "C";  
        break;
    case 6:
        lg = "D";
        break;
    default:
         if (ng < 0) {
             // polite error
             break;
         }
         lg = "F";
         break;
}

After the switch you'd have to check if a grade were set or not.

if (lg == null) {
    System.out.println("The input score was > 100 or < 0");
} else {
    System.out.println("You got an " + lg);
}
share|improve this answer
    
but then 9-0 are invalid inputs, but 9-0 are valid grades(if your not studying) –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 5:52
    
@shakabra: Not if you have case 0: included as one of your F cases –  David Robinson Feb 13 '13 at 5:53
    
OH duh. I knew that. –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 5:53
    
The only special case then is 100 which can't just be detected using case 10: since it'd catch 101 too. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 13 '13 at 5:54
    
True. I forgot about that one. –  shakabra Feb 13 '13 at 5:55

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