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I've been trying to find a neat way to remove all but the last element from a list in groovy, but all the things I've tried seem a bit overcomplicated. Is there a neater way?

FAILS: java.util.ConcurrentModificationException

void removeAllButLastInPlace(list) {
    if(list.size() > 1) {
        def remove = list[0..-2]
        remove.each { list.remove(it) }
    }
}

FAILS: java.lang.CloneNotSupportedException: java.util.ArrayList$SubList

void removeAllButLastInPlace(list) {
    if(list.size() > 1) {
        def remove = list[0..-2].clone()
        remove.each { list.remove(it) }
    }
}

WORKS, but list construction seems unnecessary

void removeAllButLastInPlace(list) {
    if(list.size() > 1) {
        def remove = [] + list[0..-2]
        remove.each { list.remove(it) }
    }
}

WORKS, but seems a bit arcane

void removeAllButLastInPlace(list) {
    (list.size() - 1).times { list.remove(0) }
}

WORKS, perhaps most 'correct'

void removeAllButLastInPlace(list) {
    list.retainAll { list.lastIndexOf(it) == list.size() - 1 }
}

The code should fulfil the following tests:

list = []
removeAllButLastInPlace(list)
assert list == []

list = ['a']
removeAllButLastInPlace(list)
assert list == ['a']

list = ['a', 'b']
removeAllButLastInPlace(list)
assert list == ['b']

list = ['a', 'b', 'c']
removeAllButLastInPlace(list)
assert list == ['c']
share|improve this question
    
What's the downvote for? –  Armand Feb 13 '13 at 9:44
    
I don't have enough rep to downvote but maybe it stands because of you've not thanked to people who are trying to help you, in anyway. –  Ömer Faruk Almalı Feb 13 '13 at 11:03

2 Answers 2

Rather than mutating an existing list., why not return a new list?

Then you can simply do:

List removeAllButLast( List list ) {
  list ? [list[-1]] : []
}

Or:

List removeAllButLastInPlace( List list ) {
  list.drop( list.size() - 1 )
}

edit:

You could also use a loop (if you have to have a mutating method)

void removeAllButLastInPlace( List list ) {
   while( list.size() > 1 ) list.remove( 0 )
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I'm aware of that. In this particular instance I specifically want to modify the list instance. –  Armand Feb 13 '13 at 9:31
1  
Fair enough, just so long as you're aware that it potentially makes your code less favorable to concurrency. –  tim_yates Feb 13 '13 at 9:33
    
I'm aware and happy with that - this particular code is for use in a shell script. –  Armand Feb 13 '13 at 9:43
    
Ok. Though code often ends up neater when it's immutable. Have fun. –  tim_yates Feb 13 '13 at 9:47
    
Thanks, and it's a useful note (neatness and concurrency). In this particular case though, reassigning the reference is not possible. –  Armand Feb 13 '13 at 9:49
void removeAllButLastInPlace( List list ) {
    def index = 0
    list.reverse(true).retainAll({index++ == 0})
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This will fail if the list contains duplicates –  tim_yates Feb 13 '13 at 9:21
    
good point :-) updated –  crudolf Feb 13 '13 at 9:27
    
That wil now just reverse the list (take does not mutate the list, so just returns a new list containing a single element which is discarded by the above method) –  tim_yates Feb 13 '13 at 9:35
    
updated, however quite ugly... –  crudolf Feb 13 '13 at 10:06

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