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This question was asked in an interview: Tree with black and white nodes is given. Find a longest path of white nodes in the given tree.Is the approach below correct or somebody help with a better approach thanks!

int Longest(node root, int max)
{
    if(root==null || root.color == black)
        return 0;
    if(root.color == white)
    {

      int curmax =1+ firstlongest(root.child) + secondlongest(root.child); 

        if(curmax>max) 
            max = curmax;
        return curmax;
    }
    if(root.color == black)
    {
        for(all children)
        {
            int curmax =1+ firstlongest(root.child) + secondlongest(root.child); 
        }
        if(curmax>max) 
            max =curmax;
        return 0;
    }
}

 int firstlongest(node* child){//will calculate first longest of children and similarly 
 secondlongest gives second.Finally max will have length of longest path.
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1  
Try codereview.stackexchange.com –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 13 '13 at 8:28
    
Try debugging first –  qPCR4vir Feb 13 '13 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Intro:
First remember how to find a longest path in a tree. You take an arbitrary vertex v, find the farthest from it vertex u with bfs, then find the farthest from u vertex t, again with bfs, and (u,t) path will be the longest in the tree. I will not prove it here, you can either google for it or try to prove yourself (it's quite obvious though, if you run it on some examples).

Solution:
Now your problem. We don't need black nodes, so let's throw them away :) The remaining graph will be a forest, i.e. set of trees. Find longest paths for every tree with known algorithm and choose the longest among all.

Complexity:
Described algo will perform one linear pass to remove black nodes, and two linear bfs for each tree in the forest, which are linear to all nodes in graph. Totally: O(n) + O(n+m) + O(n+m) = O(n+m)

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This sounds weird to me. E.g. if I choose an arbitrary vertex v, what if that vertex is a leaf node? I can see that this method would work for an undirected graph... But in a tree, nodes typically do not have references to their parents. So, starting bfs from a leaf node would yield absolutely nothing. –  Alderath Feb 13 '13 at 9:58
    
@Alderath: Yes of course all this is about undirected graphs. Finding longest path in a directed tree is totally pointless - it's just the height of the tree –  Grigor Gevorgyan Feb 13 '13 at 10:46

Your procedure only seems to compute paths that go down. Assuming all nodes white, it will miss the longest path in this tree:

      r
     /
    a
   / \
  b   c
 /     \
d       e  

The longest path is dbace.

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Then I think this will become NP hard problem if you can go up also. –  dejavu Feb 13 '13 at 9:02
    
@Android I doubt so. You have to view this as a problem on graphs. Remove every black node. Now, for each remaining forest calculate the longest path recursivly. Take the longest of the found paths. The problem boils down to finding the longest path at all. –  FUZxxl Feb 13 '13 at 9:40
    
Oh. I forgot the white nodes..Thanks –  dejavu Feb 13 '13 at 9:53

The code seems incorrect for me. The following section:

if(root.color == black)
{
    for(all children)
    {
        int curmax = max(longest(root.child[i], max));
    }
    if(curmax>max) 
        max =curmax;
    return 0;
}

will never be executed, because if root.color == black method will return 0 earlier.

Here is how I would do this:

private static int longestWhitePathFromRootLength (Node node)
{
    if (node.color == BLACK)
        return 0;
    else // node.color == WHITE
    {
        int l = 0;

        for (Node n: node.children)
        {
            l = Math.max (l, longestWhitePathFromRootLength (n));
        }

        return l + 1;
    }
}

public static int longestWhitePathLength (Node node)
{
    int l = 0;

    for (Node n: node.children)
    {
        l = Math.max (l, longestWhitePathLength (n));
    }

    return Math.max (l, longestWhitePathFromRootLength (node));
}
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This code could be optimized - it is unnecessarily quadratic. For a tree of height n, longestWhitePathFromRootLength() will get called on each level and then go down to leaves, thus giving Theta(n^2) run time. –  Rafał Dowgird Feb 13 '13 at 9:26

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