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Since I know many consider the use of PHP code inside Javascript code bad practice, I wonder how to execute a javascript function provided that a certain PHP variable has a certain value.

This is the way I currently write the code:

<script type="text/javascript">
function execute_this() {
some code;
}
<?php
if(!empty($_SESSION['authorized'])) :
?>
execute_this();
<?php
endif;
?>
</script>

Any ideas how to avoid using PHP inside Javascript in this particular example?

share|improve this question
    
can you show your complete file? as at the moment i cant completely understand our problem. –  noobie-php Feb 13 '13 at 9:11
    
Not really an answer. But you could tried ajax. If you post to a PHP page via ajax and then return the 'authorized' status. –  CharliePrynn Feb 13 '13 at 9:11
5  
There's nothing wrong with setting javascript variables from PHP. –  Matt Cain Feb 13 '13 at 9:12
1  
what possible reason do you have for doing this? what does execute_this(); do? –  jmadsen Feb 13 '13 at 9:12
    
Php code inside javascript is ok till you know what you are doing. –  itachi Feb 13 '13 at 9:13

5 Answers 5

If you don't want to include any PHP code inside the javascript code but want to know the value of a php variable, you have to integrate a communication between the server side (PHP) and the client (JS)

For example you could use a ajax request to call a small php snippet that provides the value in its reply. With that value you can go on in you java script code.

In my opinion you should decide if its worth the effort.

Edit:

In regard to the edited question: If it is important that the JS function is never ever called if the PHP session value isn't present I would stay with the PHP code but would do it that way:

<?php
if(!empty($_SESSION['authorized'])) :
?>
<script type="text/javascript">
function execute_this() {
some code;
}

execute_this();
</script>
<?php
endif;
?>

If you evaluate the value of the session variable in javascript, you have to make sure that nothing bad happens to your code if the provided value was manipulated.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't answer the question - though the question was a little badly phrased. –  Clyde Feb 13 '13 at 9:15
    
It does answers the question. –  itachi Feb 13 '13 at 9:19
    
@jmadsen the function outputs a file manager using AJAX –  Durian Nangka Feb 13 '13 at 10:00

It's a matter of code style. The time your project grows, you will find it increasingly difficult to maintain it or to extend its functionality. A better solution would be to initialize all needed variables in the beginning of the file and to externalize the main JavaScript functionality.

Example PHP:

<script type="text/javascript">
    MYCONFIG = {
        authorized: '<?php echo $_SESSION['authorized']; ?>',
        foo: 'something else'
    }
    $(document).trigger('init'); // fire init event, you can call it as you like
</script>

Example JS with jQuery (note that i use the custom trigger 'init', you can call it however you like):

$(document).on('init', function() {

    function execute_this() {
        document.write(MYCONFIG.foo);
    }

    if(MYCONFIG.authorized) {
        execute_this();
    }

})

This should be in an external JS file and does not need any PHP tags.

share|improve this answer

You have to store the php variables somewhere in the html code and then access it. For example:

<input type="hidden" id="hidval" value=<?php echo $_SESSION['authorized'] ?>/>

then in your js:

var somevar=document.getElementById(hidval).value;
if(somevar==what you want){
  execute_this();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you read the (edited) question you will see that is not what the OP is trying to do. –  Clyde Feb 13 '13 at 9:16
    
The OP is asking if it is ok to let php decide if a function-call should be included in the <script> –  fragmentedreality Feb 13 '13 at 9:17
    
he asked:Any ideas how to avoid using PHP inside Javascript in this particular example? I don't think there is any php in my js function –  CosLu Feb 13 '13 at 9:19
    
Not elegant, but indeed serves the purpose. –  itachi Feb 13 '13 at 9:20

I think you have some basic design issues, and we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg and can't fully help you.

There is nothing inherently wrong with calling a php function this way, but you have several issues:

1) you cannot separate your js file & allow for caching or cdn

2) while MVC is certainly not "mandatory", it is definitely a good idea to try to separate this type of logic from your "view" - your rendered output

3) I suspect elsewhere you have a massive security hole - if you are setting certain parameters based on whether or not they are "authorized" in their session, this means you are most likely sending back info on which to base a permissions decision in your php code somewhere. Never do that from the page - all data should be "neutral" on the page itself, because you have no control over it.

Give this a read if you are not clear why I say that: http://www.codebyjeff.com/blog/2012/12/web-form-security-avoiding-common-mistakes

share|improve this answer
    
OP keeps editing :-) so I see now the function is a javascript one. I'm still a little nervous about his security setup, and #1 certainly holds true –  jmadsen Feb 13 '13 at 9:35
    
Many thanks all. Seems like I need to rewrite my code :) –  Durian Nangka Feb 13 '13 at 10:04

There are three possible ways to do it.

  1. Use hidden field and add necessary variable value inside each fields and get those using jQuery.
  2. User jQuery Session plugin and access php session variable.
  3. make a ajax call to php and get response in json format and access response.
share|improve this answer
    
exactly what I want to say –  Subodh Ghulaxe Feb 13 '13 at 9:45

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