Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The below program, basically calls a JFrame's frame.repaint() to fill inside the frame dynamically. On the same lines, I would want to have 2 labels( West & East) of the frame and have the labels dynamically changing. I have tried lotta things like, Jlabel label.repaint(),label.removeAll(),etc, But it doesn't work. I have left the code, clean so that you can fill in...

JFrame frame=new JFrame();
frame.setSize(512, 512);
frame.add(image1);
frame.setVisible(true); 
frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);


start_sum=0;

while(true)
{
    frame.repaint();
    try {
        Thread.sleep(sleep_for_each_rotation);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    start_sum+=radian/divide_size;             //Some calculation stuff
    if(start_sum>=360)
        start_sum=0;

}
share|improve this question
    
i don't see any JLabel in the code. downvote –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Feb 13 '13 at 10:19
1  
As I mentioned, I have tried with Jlabel and failed... So I have cleaned up all the Jlabel varibales –  JS_VIPER Feb 13 '13 at 10:22
    
So what is the question if you cleaned up all the JLabels? –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Feb 13 '13 at 10:28

2 Answers 2

From the looks of you code, you are blocking the Event Dispatching Thread (EDT).

The EDT is responsible for (amongst other things), processing repaint events. This means that if you block the EDT, nothing can be repainted.

The other problem you have is, you should never create or modify any UI component from any thread other then the EDT.

Take a look at Concurrency in Swing for more details.

The following example simply uses a javax.swing.Timer, but from the sounds of things, you'll probably find Swing Worker more useful

public class TestLabelAnimation {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestLabelAnimation();
    }

    public TestLabelAnimation() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Test");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private JLabel left;
        private JLabel right;

        public TestPane() {
            setLayout(new BorderLayout());

            left = new JLabel("0");
            right = new JLabel("0");

            add(left, BorderLayout.WEST);
            add(right, BorderLayout.EAST);

            Timer timer = new Timer(250, new ActionListener() {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                    left.setText(Integer.toString((int)Math.round(Math.random() * 100)));
                    right.setText(Integer.toString((int)Math.round(Math.random() * 100)));
                }
            });

            timer.setRepeats(true);
            timer.setCoalesce(true);
            timer.start();

        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
please why timer.setCoalesce(true);, see that many times last time –  mKorbel Feb 13 '13 at 15:38
1  
@mkorbel As far as I'm aware coalesce means that if the timer finds itself with a number of events to trigger at the same time (for what ever reason), they will be coalesced into a single event, rather the a number of closely timed events. For me, it's a away to ensure that I'm not saturating the EDT unnecessarily –  MadProgrammer Feb 13 '13 at 19:28

Just use JLabel.setText (String) method like in the following example:

public static void main (String[] args) throws Exception {
    final JLabel label = new JLabel (String.valueOf (System.currentTimeMillis()));

    JFrame frame = new JFrame ();
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation (JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    frame.getContentPane().setLayout (new BorderLayout ());
    frame.getContentPane().add (label, BorderLayout.CENTER);
    frame.pack ();
    frame.setVisible(true);

    while (true)
    {
        final String newText = String.valueOf (System.currentTimeMillis ());

        SwingUtilities.invokeLater (new Runnable ()
        {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                label.setText (newText);
            }
        });

        Thread.sleep (100L);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
or label.setIcon(icon); –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Feb 13 '13 at 10:20
1  
So, you example creates the UI outside the EDT and just by luck, is able to run. This is a great example of what not to do. Take a look at Initial Threads –  MadProgrammer Feb 13 '13 at 10:31
    
agreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeed –  mKorbel Feb 13 '13 at 15:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.