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I need a version of read line that is memory save. I have this "working" solution. But I'm not sure how it behaves with memory. When I enable free(text) it works for a few lines and then I get an error. So now neither text nor result is ever freed although I malloc text. Is that correct ? And why is that so ?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char* readFromIn()
{
    char* text = malloc(1024);
    char* result = fgets(text, 1024, stdin);
    if (result[strlen(result) - 1] == 10)
        result[strlen(result) - 1] = 0;
    //free(text);
    return result;
}

I have A LOT of short lines to read with this and I also need stdin to be replaceable with a FILE* handle. There is no need for me to realloc text because I have only short lines.

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You should pass a buffer as parameter, to keep locality of mallocs and frees, which helps maintaincance. Or, better, not mallocing anything, using always the same buffer and process its contents before the next call. –  Gabriel Feb 13 '13 at 11:00
    
1) public is not a keyword in C 2) Don't malloc small buffers 3) What will happen if malloc returns zero? 4) what will happen if strlen returns zero ? –  wildplasser Feb 13 '13 at 11:07
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

fgets returns a pointer to the string, so after the fgets line, result will be the same memory address as text. Then when you call free (text); you are returning invalid memory.

You should free the memory in the calling function when you have finished with result

You could also avoid the malloc/free stuff by structuring your code to pass a buffer something like this:

void parent_function ()
{
    char *buffer[1024];

    while (readFromIn(buffer)) {
        // Process the contents of buffer
    }
}

char *readFromIn(char *buffer)
{
    char *result = fgets(buffer, 1024, stdin);
    int len;

    // fgets returns NULL on error of end of input,
    // in which case buffer contents will be undefined
    if (result == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }

    len = strlen (buffer);
    if (len == 0) {
        return NULL;
    }

    if (buffer[len - 1] == '\n') {
        buffer[len - 1] = 0;

    return buffer;
}

Trying to avoid the malloc/free is probably wise if you are dealing with many small, short lived items so that the memory doesn't get fragmented and it should faster as well.

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Is there a way to avoid malloc and free in this ? –  mini-me Feb 13 '13 at 11:04
    
You could pass a buffer into the function, I'll edit my answer to add this –  iain Feb 13 '13 at 11:05
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char *fgets(char *s, int size, FILE *stream) reads in at most one less than size characters from stream and stores them into the buffer pointed to by s. Reading stops after an EOF or a newline. If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer. A terminating null byte ('\0') is stored after the last character in the buffer.

Return Value: returns s on success, and NULL on error or when end of file occurs while no characters have been read.

So there are 2 critical problems with your code:

  1. You don't check the return value of fgets
  2. You want to deallocate the memory, where this string is stored and return a pointer to this memory. Accessing the memory, where such a pointer (dangling pointer) points to, leads to undefined behaviour.

Your function could look like this:

public char* readFromIn() {
    char* text = malloc(1024);
    if (fgets(text, 1024, stdin) != NULL) {
        int textLen = strlen(text);
        if (textLen > 0 && text[textLen - 1] == '\n')
            text[textLen - 1] == '\0';     // getting rid of newline character
        return text;
    }
    else {
        free(text);
        return NULL;
    }
}

and then caller of this function should be responsible for deallocating the memory that return value of this function points to.

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He's not trying to write 0 at the end of the string, he's removing a line feed character if it is there. –  iain Feb 13 '13 at 11:21
    
@iain: Yes, by the time you wrote that comment I was editing my answer already :) –  LihO Feb 13 '13 at 11:25
    
nitpicky suggestion: Using strcspn can save you the strlen/if check: text[strcspn(text, "\n")] = '\0'; –  undefined behaviour Feb 13 '13 at 12:11
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I know you mentioned that the lines are only short, but none of the solutions provided will work for lines greater than 1024 in length. It is for this reason that I provide a solution which will attempt to read entire lines, and resize the buffer when there's not enough space.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MINIMUM_CAPACITY 16

size_t read_line(char **buffer, size_t *capacity) {
    char *buf = *buffer;
    size_t cap = *capacity, pos = 0;

    if (cap < MINIMUM_CAPACITY) { cap = MINIMUM_CAPACITY; }

    for (;;) {
        buf = realloc(buf, cap);
        if (buf == NULL) { return pos; }
        *buffer = buf;
        *capacity = cap;

        if (fgets(buf + pos, cap - pos, stdin) == NULL) {
            break;
        }

        pos += strcspn(buf + pos, "\n");
        if (buf[pos] == '\n') {
            break;
        }

        cap *= 2;
    }

    return pos;
}

int main(void) {
    char *line = NULL;
    size_t size = 0;

    for (size_t end = read_line(&line, &size); line[end] == '\n'; end = read_line(&line, &size)) {
        line[end] = '\0'; // trim '\n' off the end
        // process contents of buffer here
    }

    free(line);
    return 0;
}

An ideal solution should be able to operate with a fixed buffer of 1 byte. This requires a more comprehensive understanding of the problem, however. Once achieved, adapting such a solution would achieve the most optimal solution.

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char *readFromIn(FILE *fp)
{
    char text[1024];
    size_t len;

    if (!fgets(text, sizeof text, fp)) return NULL;
    len = strlen(text);

    while (len && text[len-1] == '\n') text[--len] = 0;

    return strdup(text);
}
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Why did no one propose to move the buffer from heap to stack ? This is my solution now:

char input[1024]; // held ready as buffer for fgets

char* readFromIn()
{
    char* result = fgets(input, 1024, stdin);
    if (result == null)
        return "";
    if (result[strlen(result) - 1] == '\n')
        result[strlen(result) - 1] = 0;
    return result;
}
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Your function returns a pointer to automatc storage ("the stack") which pointer is not valid outside the function. –  wildplasser Feb 13 '13 at 13:01
    
@wildplasser Are you sure ? I'm testing it right now and it runs with 30+ lines per sec for several minutes with no problem. –  mini-me Feb 13 '13 at 13:04
    
Have you also tried using the resulting string? –  wildplasser Feb 13 '13 at 13:07
    
@wildplasser Yes, reading! I'm comparing it with strcmp after each read. I'll try writing to it. –  mini-me Feb 13 '13 at 13:27
    
strcmp() could be inlined. Try printf("%s\n", the_string); from the calling function. –  wildplasser Feb 13 '13 at 13:43
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