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I'm having trouble with pointers. I know I should have gone to office hours, but I'm in desperate need of help. The biggest problem right now is trying to debug this program. From my understanding, I'm supposed to declare an address in my void functions. After, I have to use & for readfile(%testarray). What am I doing wrong? The objective of my program is to read a file of numbers and store them in an array. Then, I would print all of the numbers in my array. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

sort.c:11:3: warning: passing argument 1 of 'read_file' makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]
sort.c:3:6: note: expected 'int **' but argument is of type 'int'
sort.c: In function 'read_file':
sort.c:27:3: warning: format '%d' expects argument of type 'int *', but argument 3 has type 'int' [-Wformat]

Code:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    void read_file(int* myList[]);

    int main()
    {
      int testarray[20];
      read_file(&testarray[20]);
      return 0;
    }

    void read_file(int* myList[])
    {
      FILE* inFile;
      int i;
      inFile = fopen("data.txt","r");
      if (inFile == NULL)
      {
        printf("Unable to open file");
        exit(1);
      }
        i = 0;
        while (fscanf(inFile,"%d", *myList[i]) != EOF)
      {
        printf("%d ", *myList[i]);
        i = i+1;
      }
      printf("\n");
      printf("%d\n", i );
     } //void
share|improve this question
    
Thank you so much. I really appreciate the help. Here's what I changed. Edit: It seems I cant post the code here with out the correct formatting. But I followed dasblinkenlight's advice and all of the warnings are gone –  user2068177 Feb 13 '13 at 12:29
    
You may wish to clarify your loop. while fscanf reads 1 item translates to while (fscanf(inFile, "%d", &integer) == 1), since a return value of 0 is not EOF but does indicate that no items were read. –  undefined behaviour Feb 13 '13 at 13:11

5 Answers 5

When you use square brackets [] after a name in a function header, you tell the compiler that you are passing an array.

  • int testarray[] means an array of integers
  • int *testarray[] means an array of integer pointers

Since you pass an array of integers, the function signature should be either

void read_file(int myList[]);

or its equivalent

void read_file(int *myList);

The call should look like this:

read_file(testarray);

Next, on the subject of & vs. *: ampersand makes a pointer from an value expression that has an address, while an asterisk makes a value from a pointer expression. scanf takes a pointer, so you need to call it with either

fscanf(inFile,"%d", &myList[i])

or an equivalent

fscanf(inFile,"%d", myList+i)
share|improve this answer

You should be using:

read_file(&testarray);

As you try to pass a pointer to the whole array. What you have done simply takes the address of the 20-th element in the array(which is out of bounds btw).

share|improve this answer

Here is your fixed code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


void read_file(int myList[20]);

int main()
{
    int testarray[20];
    read_file(testarray);
    return 0;
}

void read_file(int myList[20])
{
    FILE* inFile;
    int i;
    inFile = fopen("data.txt","r");
    if (inFile == NULL)
    {
        printf("Unable to open file");
        exit(1);
    }
    i = 0;
    while (fscanf(inFile,"%d", &myList[i]) != EOF)
    {
        printf("%d ", myList[i]);
        i = i+1;
    }
    printf("\n");
    printf("%d\n", i );
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Downvote, Why?. –  user1944441 Feb 13 '13 at 12:16
    
not me, but they probably expected you to add at least few words in your answer. Explanations, etc. For instance, you're the only one so far that spotted (and fixed) another error in the code, but since you haven't said anything about it, ... –  Will Ness Feb 13 '13 at 12:17
    
Other 3 answers do that really nicely, i just had the whole code and why not posting it. –  user1944441 Feb 13 '13 at 12:18

The expression &testarray[20] is a pointer to one beyond the last entry in the array (i.e. the same as int *), which is not the same as a pointer to an array. And besides, you now declare the argument to be an array of pointers, not a pointer to an array. (difference between int *arr[] and int (*arr)[]).

Also, you don't need to pass a pointer to the array to the function, instead just let the function have a normal array (or pointer) argument, and pass the array as-is:

void read_file(int myList[]);

int main(void)
{
    int testarray[20];
    read_file(testarray);
    /* .... */
}

Inside the read_file you don't need the dereference operator * when using the array. You can use it as a normal array.

share|improve this answer

Assuiming 10 numbers in the text file, refer the following code :

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    void read_file(int *);

    int main()
    {
     int *List=(int *)malloc(10*sizeof(int));// Allocate memory for 10 integers
     read_file(List); 
     return 0;
    }

/* Passing a pointer to the contiguous locations, just the starting location is enough*/
    void read_file(int *ptr)
    {
     FILE *inFile;
     inFile=fopen("Numbers.txt","r");
     int i=0;
     if(inFile!=NULL)
      while(fscanf(inFile,"%d",ptr)!=EOF)
      {    
       printf("%d ",*(ptr));
       i++;
      }
      free(ptr);// Free the memory Locations
     } 
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