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I am not able to understand this. I tried doing a small example in VS2010 as below.

"Creating a static class is therefore much the same as creating a class that contains only static members and a private constructor"

Does this statement means a class with private constructor and one or more static methods like below is static class ? I know we call a class static only when static keyword is mentioned in class.

Also, we cannot inherit the below class and also we can't instantiate this class right ?

public class Base
{
    private Base() { Console.WriteLine(" I am from normal Base constructor"); }
    static void NewMethod() { Console.WriteLine("Hey I am from Static Base"); }
    public void New() { } 
}
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3  
Only static members is not the same thing as one or more static methods. –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 13 '13 at 13:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

What it means is that:

public static class Foo
{
    public static void Bar() { }
}

is essentially the same as

public class Foo
{
    private Foo() { }
    public static void Bar() { }
}

because if the class only has a private constructor, it cannot be instantiated outside the class.

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Thank you for the quick example, its easy to understand :) so it means 1) we cannot inherit the class also right ? I mean the class with private constructor. 2) And also, can this class with private constructor have many static methods ? 3) Whats the term you use to call such a class with private constructor ? Its again Static class you say ? 4) Someone above told that, "Contains only static members is not the same thing as one or more static methods". Hows this possible ? I am not able to understand the difference. –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 13:43
    
1) Yes, you cannot inherit from a class which only has a private constructor. 2) Yes, as far as I know there is no limit to the number of methods a class can declare although you should ensure that the class does not start doing to much (read up on Single Responsibility Principle) 3) It's essentially "sealed" because if it only contains private constructors it cannot be inherited from or instantiated. 4) what they mean is that a class can have instance and static methods, in this case you cannot have a static class since it cannot contain instance methods. –  Trevor Pilley Feb 13 '13 at 13:49
    
Correct, that what is meant. It's not exactly the same, of course. For example, in the second case it will be allowed to say Foo variable = null;, or define a method void M(Foo foo) { }. Also, if you don't mark it as sealed, one can use generic constraints like where T : Foo. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '13 at 13:49
3  
A non-sealed class all of whose instance constructors are private, can be inherited from only by classes nested withing itself. In the above example, Foo contains no nested types. Also, the private constructors can be used to instantiate the class from inside the class, but the above Foo contains no new object expressions. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '13 at 13:52
    
@TrevorPilley: Thank you so much, that aptly answer all my questions in the way that I can chew :). I have one more question, its silly though. Whats the difference between having a method explicitly saying sealed and having a method with private constructor (Leaving behind the advantage of private constructors or static method) –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 13:57

Creating a static class is therefore much the same as creating a class that contains only static members and a private constructor

This statement is attempting to get across the right idea but failing to do so. A static class is not like a class with only static members and a private constructor. Here's a class with static members and private constructor:

class X
{
    private X() {}
    public static X Y() { return new X(); }
}

But that's not at all like a static class! The author of that statement seems to think that having a private constructor prevents you from making instances, but of course it does not.

A more accurate statement would be:

Creating a static class is much like creating a class that is both abstract and sealed, and contains no instance members.

And in fact, when the C# compiler generates the code for a static class, that's precisely what it does: it marks the class as both abstract (so it cannot be instantiated directly) and sealed (so that it cannot be extended).

I note that it is not legal for you to declare a class both abstract and sealed yourself; the only way to do so in C# is to make a static class.

I will bring the misleading sentence to the attention of the MSDN documentation managers. Thanks for pointing it out.

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Hi Eric Lippert, thank you so much for taking time to write to me and make me understand. I know, I was a bit uncomfortable to convey what I thought, you got it very correct. Thank you so much again. And one thing that surprised me is, before seeing your statement "I note that it is not legal for you to declare a class both abstract and sealed yourself; the only way to do so in C# is to make a static class.", when I read until the line above this statement, I quickly went to VS and did abstract and sealed and got error and when I was about to write to you back, but I found you have addressed –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 16:39
    
So I am very happy that you addressed and cleared my every doubt on this. :) Thank you so much. Cheers –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 16:40
1  
@Divine: You are very welcome. I have spoken with the documentation manager and he will look into updating that page to make it a bit more clear. –  Eric Lippert Feb 13 '13 at 16:41
    
@@Eric: Thank you so much again. I appreciate it greatly :) Cheers –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 16:42
2  
@Jowen: Avoiding a language feature because you find it "contrary to OOP" seems unfortunate; it's a useful feature. OOP is goodness because that style of programming lowers the costs of writing software in large teams, not because it is blessed by the gods of programming. The important thing is that your programs be correct, understandable, maintainable, and solve a real customer problem, not that they be beautiful examples of OOP. –  Eric Lippert Jul 2 '13 at 15:41

"Does this statement mean a class with private constructor and one or more static methods like below is a static class?"

The answer is No, and one difference is explained in exactly the next sentence after the one you are citing from MSDN:

The advantage of using a static class is that the compiler can check to make sure that no instance members are accidentally added.


It means that you will get a compiler error in Class2 shown below.

public class Class1
{
    private Class1() { }
    public static void Method() { }
    private string member; // valid, but pointless
}

public static class Class2
{
    public static void Method() { }
    private string member; // error CS0708
}

More important, although Class1 has a private constructor, it may still be instantiated:

public class Class1
{
    private Class1() { }

    private static Class1 instance = new Class1();

    public static Class1 Instance
    {
        get { return instance; }
    }
}

A static class on the other hand, may never be instantiated.

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Hi Clemens, thank you so much for the point that the class can still be instantiated when it has private constructor. So this is something they call it as Singleton ? Correct ? –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 14:01
    
Could you please tell me a real time example of when this kind of instantiation of a class with private constructor happens ? –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 14:18
1  
I've edited my answer to show how Class1 would implement the singleton pattern. You would access the singleton instance by the static Class1.Instance property. –  Clemens Feb 13 '13 at 14:31
1  
var name = Class1.Instance.Name;. Note that what you declared is not a property, but a public field. –  Clemens Feb 13 '13 at 16:53
1  
With get or set accessors it's a property, without it's a field. Perhaps you mean auto-implemented properties, which would be written public string Name { get; set; }. –  Clemens Feb 13 '13 at 17:16

You can not inherit as there is no public constructor, only a private constructor exists. For the same reason you can not create an instance.

Within the scope of this question, they can be seen as the same. Can you call it a static class; I think officially you do not since it is not marked as static in the class definition. But in the perspective of functionality you may call it static.

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Hi, that really answers my question, thank you :) –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 13:50
    
Of course, it's not really static. You can still do var list = new List<Base>(); or var array = new Base[100]; for example. See other examples in my comments to other questions. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '13 at 14:01
    
Thank you Jeppe :) –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 14:02

With your example, the only way the New() method can be called is if you add another method to return a Base instance since Base can't be instantiated by another class. Not having that extra method makes it functionally the same as a static class.

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Though the compiler doesn't know that. It will still allow stuff like Base variable = null;, var list = new List<Base>();, public Base Method(Base parameter) { return null; }, generic constraints of the form where T : Base, and lots of other constructions that are meaningless and disallowed for truely static classes. (And of course via reflection you can instantiate Base and run the private constructor if you like; this cannot happen with a static type since it's abstract as seen from the Framework.) –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '13 at 14:16

Where did you get the statement:

Creating a static class is therefore much the same as creating a class that contains only static members and a private constructor

What it is trying to say is that you can not create an instance of a static class.

The way to create a static class is to use the static keyword. All members in the class must also be static.

public static class MyStaticClass
{
      static MyStaticClass() { /* Constructor.  Optional. */ }
      public static void MyMethod() { ... }
      public static int MyProperty{ get; set; }
}

Note again, you can not create an instance of this class. The following call will not compile:

new MyStaticClass();
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Hi Josh, I got that statement from MSDN: Please follow msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/79b3xss3(v=vs.80).aspx –  Deevinee Feb 13 '13 at 13:50

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