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I'm writing a dynamically-typed language. Currently, my objects are represented in this way:

struct Class { struct Class* class; struct Object* (*get)(struct Object*,struct Object*); };
struct Integer { struct Class* class; int value; };
struct Object { struct Class* class; };
struct String { struct Class* class; size_t length; char* characters; };

The goal is that I should be able to pass everything around as a struct Object* and then discover the type of the object by comparing the class attribute. For example, to cast an integer for use I would simply do the following (assume that integer is of type struct Class*):

struct Object* foo = bar();

// increment foo
if(foo->class == integer)
    ((struct Integer*)foo)->value++;
else
    handleTypeError();

The problem is that, as far as I know, the C standard makes no promises about how structures are stored. On my platform this works. But on another platform struct String might store value before class and when I accessed foo->class in the above I would actually be accessing foo->value, which is obviously bad. Portability is a big goal here.

There are alternatives to this approach:

struct Object
{
    struct Class* class;
    union Value
    {
        struct Class c;
        int i;
        struct String s;
    } value;
};

The problem here is that the union uses up as much space as the size of the largest thing that can be stored in the union. Given that some of my types are many times as large as my other types, this would mean that my small types (int) would take up as much space as my large types (map) which is an unacceptable tradeoff.

struct Object
{
    struct Class* class;
    void* value;
};

This creates a level of redirection that will slow things down. Speed is a goal here.

The final alternative is to pass around void*s and manage the internals of the structure myself. For example, to implement the type test mentioned above:

void* foo = bar();

// increment foo
if(*((struct Class*) foo) == integer)
    (*((int*)(foo + sizeof(struct Class*))))++;
else
    handleTypeError();

This gives me everything I want (portability, different sizes for different types, etc.) but has at least two downsides:

  1. Hideous, error-prone C. The code above only calculates a single-member offset; it will get much worse with types more complex than integers. I might be able to alleviate this a bit using macros, but this will be painful no matter what.
  2. Since there is no struct that represents the object, I don't have the option of stack allocations (at least without implementing my own stack on the heap).

Basically, my question is, how can I get what I want without paying for it? Is there a way to be portable, have variance in size for different types, not use redirection, and keep my code pretty?

EDIT: This is the best response I've ever received for an SO question. Choosing an answer was hard. SO only allows me to choose one answer so I chose the one that lead me to my solution, but you all received upvotes.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See Python PEP 3123 (http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-3123/) for how Python solves this problem using standard C. The Python solution can be directly applied to your problem. Essentially you want to do this:

struct Object { struct Class* class; };
struct Integer { struct Object object; int value; };
struct String { struct Object object; size_t length; char* characters; };

You can safely cast Integer* to Object*, and Object* to Integer* if you know that your object is an integer.

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Thanks for that link; I learned a lot from it. –  Imagist Sep 28 '09 at 7:42
    
According to your link, it looks like this can be done with less indirection than your code; specifically: "[I]f a struct starts with an int, the struct * may also be cast to an int *, allowing to write int values into the first field." This means that in this case the struct Integer* can be cast to a struct Class**, meaning that I don't have to change my declarations; I only need to be sure to reference the class through pointers (that's how I'm passing them around anyway). –  Imagist Sep 28 '09 at 7:49

C gives you sufficient guarantees that your first approach will work. The only modification you need to make is that in order to make the pointer aliasing OK, you must have a union in scope that contains all of the structs that you are casting between:

union allow_aliasing {
    struct Class class;
    struct Object object;
    struct Integer integer;
    struct String string;
};

(You don't need to ever use the union for anything - it just has to be in scope)

I believe the relevant part of the standard is this:

[#5] With one exception, if the value of a member of a union object is used when the most recent store to the object was to a different member, the behavior is implementation-defined. One special guarantee is made in order to simplify the use of unions: If a union contains several structures that share a common initial sequence (see below), and if the union object currently contains one of these structures, it is permitted to inspect the common initial part of any of them anywhere that a declaration of the completed type of the union is visible. Two structures share a common initial sequence if corresponding members have compatible types (and, for bit-fields, the same widths) for a sequence of one or more initial members.

(This doesn't directly say it's OK, but I believe that it does guarantee that if two structs have a common intial sequence and are put into a union together, they'll be laid out in memory the same way - it's certainly been idiomatic C for a long time to assume this, anyway).

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I would probably upvote you, but I'm too tired to really be able to think about code right now. –  Chris Lutz Sep 28 '09 at 5:17
    
The requirement for the union is pretty close to purely theoretical though. The reason is pretty simple: if you create one of these structs, and pass it to code in another translation unit, and that TU does define the union, the struct has to be compatible. Since the compiler doesn't know about any other TUs, it's left with only one choice: assure the structs are compatible in case you might... –  Jerry Coffin Sep 28 '09 at 5:22
1  
Jerry: Sure, you know that they'll be laid out the same way in memory - but in the absence of the union the compiler is free to optimise under the assumption that if you modify an object of type struct String, no objects of type struct Object will be changed. This is known as "strict aliasing". –  caf Sep 28 '09 at 5:33
    
@caf: that could only possibly apply if the variables were of the union type -- it can't apply to the separate structures. At the least, the code would have to be using the union to get the guarantee provided by the quoted section (where does it appear in the C99 standard, BTW?). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '09 at 5:58
    
@caf: section 6.2.5 of ISO 9899:1999 says: A structure type describes a sequentially allocated nonempty set of member objects (and, in certain circumstances, an incomplete array), each of which has an optionally specified name and possibly distinct type. Section 6.7.2.1 also says: As discussed in 6.2.5, a structure is a type consisting of a sequence of members, whose storage is allocated in an ordered sequence, and a union is a type consisting of a sequence of members whose storage overlap. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '09 at 6:06

Section 6.2.5 of ISO 9899:1999 (the C99 standard) says:

A structure type describes a sequentially allocated nonempty set of member objects (and, in certain circumstances, an incomplete array), each of which has an optionally specified name and possibly distinct type.

Section 6.7.2.1 also says:

As discussed in 6.2.5, a structure is a type consisting of a sequence of members, whose storage is allocated in an ordered sequence, and a union is a type consisting of a sequence of members whose storage overlap.

[...]

Within a structure object, the non-bit-field members and the units in which bit-fields reside have addresses that increase in the order in which they are declared. A pointer to a structure object, suitably converted, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides), and vice versa. There may be unnamed padding within a structure object, but not at its beginning.

This guarantees what you need.

In the question you say:

The problem is that, as far as I know, the C standard makes no promises about how structures are stored. On my platform this works.

This will work on all platforms. It also means that your first alternative - what you are currently using - is safe enough.

But on another platform struct StringInteger might store value before class and when I accessed foo->class in the above I would actually be accessing foo->value, which is obviously bad. Portability is a big goal here.

No compliant compiler is allowed to do that. [I replaced String by Integer assuming you were referring to the first set of declarations. On closer examination, you might have been referring to the structure with an embedded union. The compiler still isn't allowed to reorder class and value.]

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1  
The sections you cite guarantee the layout of the struct, however the standard also says "An object shall have its stored value accessed only by an lvalue expression that has one of the following types:", followed by a list of conditions (6.5 bullet 7). Accessing an Integer* through an Object* is undefined AFAIK, and could cause inappropriate optimizations to be performed. This is why Python stopped using this style, see python.org/dev/peps/pep-3123 . –  Josh Haberman Sep 28 '09 at 7:28
    
This is good news; at least for compilers that comply with this part of the C99 standard, my code will work. –  Imagist Sep 28 '09 at 7:28
    
@Josh Haberman: I'll have to read the PEP rather more carefully than I'm willing to at this time of night. However, superficially, it looks like the fix is very similar to the code above. I presume I'm missing something. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '09 at 8:37

The problem is that, as far as I know, the C standard makes no promises about how structures are stored. On my platform this works. But on another platform struct String might store value before class and when I accessed foo->class in the above I would actually be accessing foo->value, which is obviously bad. Portability is a big goal here.

I believe you're wrong here. First, because your struct String doesn't have a value member. Second, because I believe C does guarantee the layout in memory of your struct's members. That's why the following are different sizes:

struct {
    short a;
    char  b;
    char  c;
}

struct {
    char  a;
    short b;
    char  c;
}

If C made no guarantees, then compilers would probably optimize both of those to be the same size. But it guarantees the internal layout of your structs, so the natural alignment rules kick in and make the second one larger than the first.

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Care to correct whatever you find factually inaccurate? Or do you just want to downvote? –  Chris Lutz Sep 28 '09 at 5:22
    
I didn't downvote, but C definitely does not guarantee the layout in memory of member variables, however you ARE guaranteed that you can always cast a pointer to a struct to a pointer to the first member of the struct. –  Falaina Sep 28 '09 at 5:50
1  
+1: It looks fine to me, too. I suppose the most pedantic could argue that on a machine where there is insufficient penalty for misaligned access to the short member, the structures could be the same size; I'm not aware of such a machine. And some compilers support a pragma to achieve that effect. Nevertheless, where portability is the goal (as stated in the question), the only safe assumption is that the two structures will have different sizes. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '09 at 5:55
1  
@Falaina: you are guaranteed that the sequence of the members is as written in the structure declaration. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '09 at 5:55
    
The only downvote I can imagine is because short and char might be the same size on some machine, but it seems really obtuse to downvote for a technicality in a simple example meant to demonstrate a point. –  Chris Lutz Sep 28 '09 at 5:58

I appreciate the pedantic issues raised by this question and answers, but I just wanted to mention that CPython has used similar tricks "more or less forever" and it's been working for decades across a huge variety of C compilers. Specifically, see object.h, macros like PyObject_HEAD, structs like PyObject: all kinds of Python Objects (down at the C API level) are getting pointers to them forever cast back and forth to/from PyObject* with no harm done. It's been a while since I last played sea lawyer with an ISO C Standard, to the point that I don't have a copy handy (!), but I do believe that there are some constraints there that should make this keep working as it has for nearly 20 years...

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2  
Alex: You might be interested in this article on strict aliasing: cellperformance.beyond3d.com/articles/2006/06/… –  caf Sep 28 '09 at 5:37
1  
On the other hand, see PEP 3123 (python.org/dev/peps/pep-3123) for why Python changed the definition of PyObject_HEAD in Py3k to conform to standard C. –  Josh Haberman Sep 28 '09 at 7:13

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