Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is the code i have trouble understanding:

class A 
{ 
protected: 
   int _i; 
   A () : _i(0) { } 
   ~A () { } 
}; 

class B: public A 
{ 
public: 
   A *_pa; 
   B()  : A(), _pa(new A())
   { } 

  ~B () 
   { 
      delete _pa; 
   } 
}; 

int main () 
{ 
   A a; //ERROR
   B b; //ERROR
}

When trying to instantiate a class of type A i get an error because it's constructor is protected. But why can't I instantiate a class of type B? The class has access to protected members of A (including the ctor) so it should compile.

share|improve this question
2  
Also paste the error and the line where it's appearing. –  iammilind Feb 13 '13 at 13:51
    
Why do you want to have a member class pointer and an inherited class of type A? –  Tyler Jandreau Feb 13 '13 at 13:52
    
@TylerJandreau obviously, he is just testing protected constructors... –  André Puel Feb 13 '13 at 13:54
    
@AndréPuel Don't obviously me, guy. I just wanted some clarity. –  Tyler Jandreau Feb 13 '13 at 13:57
    
@TylerJandreau just testing Tyler –  Tom Feb 13 '13 at 13:58
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your error is located the new A inside the B constructor, not on the call to super's constructor.

Let me explain you how protected works. When you have a class B, which is subclass of A it does not have access to protected elements of A, it has access to protected elements of A when dealing with a B reference.

To show my point:

#include <iostream>

class A {
protected:
    int a;
};

class B : public A {
public:
    void do_it(A* a) {
        std::cout << a->a << std::endl; //ERROR
    }
    void do_it(B* a) {
        std::cout << a->a << std::endl; //VALID CODE
    }
};

I guess the reason behind this behavior is that if you have a third class C which also access A protected members, probably it is not a good idea that someone else change these protected values.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm so it's because new is in the global scope –  Tom Feb 13 '13 at 14:46
    
@Tom No, new is in B context, which does not have access to A without using B reference. new A is a pointer to A, not to B, so you cannot access it's constructor... –  André Puel Feb 13 '13 at 14:52
add comment

Deriving from A only gives you access to protected members that you access through "this" or through another B. B doesn't have access to _pa's protected members.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You have an error in main. In there you can not instantiate A, because its constructor is protected.

Additionally you are not able to call the constructor of _pa in the constructor of B.

share|improve this answer
    
I know but i can't instantiate B neither. I understand why A won't work –  Tom Feb 13 '13 at 13:57
add comment

At the constructor of B, A constructor is called. Because of A's constructor is protected, calling A's constructor at the B's constructor gives error. Also in the protected scope of A, there is destructor. When B's destructor is invoked, its base class (A)'s destructor is called also. Because A's destructor is protected, there occurs another error also. If you take the out the A's constructor off from the B's constructor, there still shows error. But you can get rid of the errors after making public the A's destructor.

public:
   ~A () { }

This deduction made by inspection the errors given by codeblocks, but seems wrong. Removing _pa(new A()) is the exact solution.@AndréPuel 's answer more correct.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.