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Anyone has expirience on having Jruby project running on Jboss (using torquebox or whatever) with an ability to communicate with another "japps" not on the same jboss where jruby app is, i.e. some java project on another jboss?

I know there is an torque-messanging but dunno if it's possible to communicate with external(out of jruby-app's jboss) app?

Best practices are welcomed.
Thanks in advance.

P.S. placing that other app on the jboss where jruby app is not acceptible solution.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Torquebox supports JMS. The gem you specified torquebox-messaging allows for publishing and processing of HornetQ messages on the local JBoss AS server/cluster that the JRuby app is running in. I don't think it currently supports connecting to remote servers.

Using this functionality in your JRuby app you could then configure your Java app on another server to communicate with HornetQ running in the JBoss AS that the JRuby app is running on.

Alternatively you could always implement your own communication protocol or use another Java library - you have access to anything Java you want to run from JRuby.

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I can recommend you to use Thrift and build communication via them.

Thrift have generator for both your needed languages (Java and JRuby) and provide good and fast communication.

UPDATED: Thrift is RPC (remote procedure call) framework developed at Facebook. In detail you can read about it in Wiki.

In few word to save you time, what it is and how to use it:

You describe you data structures and service interface in .thrift file(files). And generate from this file all needed source files(with all need serialization) for one or few languages(what you need). Than you can simple create server and client in few lines

Using it inside client will be looks like you just use simple class.

With Thrift you can use what protocol and transport used. In most cases uses Binary or Compact protocol via Blocked or Not-blocked transport. So network communication will be light and fast + with fast serialization.

SOAP(based on XML on HTTP) packages, its in few times bigger, and inappropriate for sending binary data, but not only this. Also XML-serialization is very slow. So with SOAP you receive big overhead. Also with soap you need to write (or use third-party) lib for calling server(tiny network layer), thrift already made it for you.

SMTP and basically JMS is inappropriate for realtime and question-answer communication. I mean if you need just to put some message in queue and someone sometime give this message and process it — you can (and should) use JMS or any other MQ services(Thrift can do this to, but MQ architecture is better for this issue). But if you need realtime query-answer calls, you should use RPC, as protocol it can be HTTP(REST, SOAP), binary(Thrift, ProtoBuf, JDBC, etc) or any other. Thrift (and ProtoBuf) provide framework for generate client and server, so it incapsulate you from low level issues.

P.S: I made some example in past (communication via Thrift Java server + Java Client or node.js client), maybe it will be useful for someone . But you can found more simple and better examples.

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Could you, please, describe a little bit what Thrift is and can it be compared with soap or smth? – ted Feb 13 '13 at 16:38
@ted, I update my answer, I hope it help you. – iMysak Feb 14 '13 at 0:19

You can use Web Services or JMS for that

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Sure but how can we communicate with JMS? SOAP is good but it brings complexity. Torque-messiging is perfect because it can have some API or whatever. But can it communicate with JMS? – ted Feb 13 '13 at 15:02

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