Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this code:

var weakRef = new WeakReference(new StringBuilder("Mehran"));
if (weakRef.IsAlive)
{
    // Garbage Collection might happen.
    Console.WriteLine((weakRef.Target as StringBuilder).ToString());
}

It's possible for GC.Collect to run after checking weakRef.IsAlive and before using the weakRef.Target.

Am I wrong with this? If it's possible, ss there a safe way to do that?

For example an API like weakRef.GetTargetIfIsAlive() would be appropriate.

share|improve this question
1  
1  
You should first cast to a strong reference and then check for null. There´s no way you can assure your strong reference will not be null beforehand. –  John Willemse Feb 13 '13 at 15:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That API already exists; weakRef.Target returns null if the object has already been garbage collected.

StringBuilder sb = weakRef.Target as StringBuilder;
if (sb != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
}
share|improve this answer

The IsAlive property does not exist for the benefit of code which will want to use the target if it is alive, but rather for the benefit of code which wants to find out if the target has died but wouldn't be interested in accessing it in any case. If code were to test Target against null, that would cause Target to momentarily have a strong rooted reference (the code that's testing against null), and it's possible that the act of generating such a rooted reference might prevent the object from being garbage-collected when it otherwise would be. If the code isn't interested in Target except to find out whether it has yet been invalidated, there's no reason for code to get the reference. It can simply test IsAlive instead, and take suitable action if it returns false.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering why IsAlive exists. This is a very clever answer, Thanks. –  mehrandvd Mar 2 '13 at 5:17

Take a local copy of the target and check for null.

WeakReference.Target will return null if the target has been collected but you're concern is that it's collected between your .IsAlive check and getting the target.

var weakRef = new WeakReference(new StringBuilder("Mehran"));

if (weakRef.IsAlive)
{
    var stringBuilder = weakRef.Target as StringBuilder;

    if (stringBuilder != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(stringBuilder.ToString());
    }
}

Console.WriteLine((weakRef.Target as StringBuilder).ToString()); will throw a null reference exception if the cast fails.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering why checking weakRef.IsAlive is required, @supercat answered the question, so I think checking it is not necessary. –  mehrandvd Mar 2 '13 at 5:20
1  
@mehrandvd It might not be necessary, I only used it in this example as it was based upon your original question. It can't do any harm to use it but yes it is possibly a pointless check given the as cast and null check on .Target. –  Trevor Pilley Mar 2 '13 at 9:00
    
@TrevorPilley: Using IsAlive on a WeakReference if a true value would mean one wants to retrieve the target is pointless. It's possible that with some garbage collectors, using if (wr1.IsAlive && wr2.IsAlive && wr3.IsAlive) {Foo wt1 = wr1.Target as Foo, wt2 = wr2.Target as Foo, wt3 = wr3.Target as Foo; if (wr1 != null && wr2 != null && wr3 != null) {... use all three things...} might be helpful if e.g. a concurrent garbage-collector worked by keeping track of whether a reference to something had been created since the last GC. On such a GC, if wr3 had died but wr1 and wr2 was alive... –  supercat Dec 18 '13 at 19:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.