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I am bit confused about the service contract definitions in ServiceStack.

As mentioned here https://github.com/ServiceStack/ServiceStack/wiki/SilverlightServiceClient

its possible to use a Portable Class Library or Linked Projects. (Ok, PCL has the limitation to not support the [RestService] Attribute or in general, any external references.)

Actually, there is now always a RouteAttribute used instead of the RestServiceAttribue.

There is a new API: https://github.com/ServiceStack/ServiceStack/wiki/New-Api

So instead of MyCall, MyCallResponse and MyCallService classes its possible to use generics or types directly, like:

[Route("/reqstars")]
public class AllReqstars : IReturn<List<Reqstar>> { }

public class ReqstarsService : Service
{
    public List<Reqstar> Get(AllReqstars request) 
    {
        return Db.Select<Reqstar>();
    }
}

Now think of a vanilla project:

  1. I want to have a place where my DTO and 'Models' are defined and shared. I just want to define them once, tag them with validation attributes etc. and reuse them in any silverlight project as well as in my fluent nhibernate assembly for data access. Thats what i call the Contracts Assembly. This can be a PCL or linked Projects for each technology stack, in my case: Silverlight and .NET 4 (server side). I don't want to generate my service clients every day, thats why i want to do the channel factory approach / servicestack client's way.

  2. Beside of having a DAL (this is not my part of a question), i want to have a seperate Assembly for the service logic itself. A strict seperation of contracts and business logic. The first thing i noticed, i was unable to find any matching nuget-package to inherit my service implementations from Service (the ServiceStack one) without getting an assembly spam. At last, i decided to use:

    PM> Install-Package ServiceStack.Host.AspNet ....

    Successfully added 'Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure 1.0.0.0' to HR.RoBP.Services.

    Successfully added 'WebActivator 1.5.3' to HR.RoBP.Services.

    Successfully added 'ServiceStack.Redis 3.9.35' to HR.RoBP.Services.

    Successfully added 'ServiceStack.OrmLite.SqlServer 3.9.35' to HR.RoBP.Services.

    Successfully added 'ServiceStack 3.9.35' to HR.RoBP.Services.

    Successfully added 'ServiceStack.Host.AspNet 3.9.33' to HR.RoBP.Services.

and removed the also added files in the project (App_Start, jquery... etc.).

The Service project is referenced and hosted by the Host project.

Where should the routing be done? Right now i must do it in the Contracts or manually in the Host assembly. I assume the Service should say how it should be accessed/routed.

Should i move the Request/Response pattern classes to the Services assembly?

Is my approach completely wrong?

Before i used WCF. I had my Model, Request/Response and a IService definition in the Contracts Assembly, the implementation of the IService in the Services assembly. The Host just required a .svc file and it was working. I also was able to use it without any communication framework around, directly with calling the service (e.g. from a commandline app without instancing a wcf endpoint).

var result = new MyCallService().Execute(new MyCall() { MyParamater="Value"})

vs.

var result = new MyCallService().MyCall("Value");

Should I introduce the old fashioned way of IMyCallService, implement it, and Call it inside the MyCallService (ServiceStack) Execute() method, using ioc stuff...

public class MyCallSevice : Service
{
    // use DI
    [Import]
    public IMyCallService ServiceInstance { private get; set; }
    public MyCallResponse Execute(MyCall request)
    {
        return new MyCallResponse(ServiceInstance.MyCall(request.MyParameter));
    }
}

// or use the Request Response directly in the Service? so that it looks like this:

public class MyCallSevice : Service
{
    // use DI
    [Import]
    public IMyCallService ServiceInstance { private get; set; }
    public MyCallResponse Execute(MyCall request)
    {
        return ServiceInstance.MyCall(request);
    }
}

My goal is more speed, in the application when executed as well as the coding speed. I dont want to have to much places or steps to touch when adding new method.

Whats the best practice i should do? Any tips or experience data is welcome!

Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
1  
The method name should not be named Execute but e.g. named Any. Sorry for that mistake (free typing) –  MVCible Feb 13 '13 at 15:37

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