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I'm trying to figure out how to allocate a block of memory in a function and pass back a pointer to that block through one of the arguments. This is a C program. I seem to be having some trouble. Here's the code:

void foo(char *ptr)
{
     if (!(ptr = malloc(size)))
          printf("error");

     /* code here */

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)buffer);
}

int main()
{
     char *ptr;
     ptr = NULL;

     foo(ptr);

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)buffer);
}

And the result is:

buffer address: 142385160
buffer address: 0

but I was expecting something like:

buffer address: 142385160
buffer address: 142385160

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
I don't believe that this code gives the output that you've posted. What's buffer declared to be? What changes it between main and foo? –  Charles Bailey Sep 28 '09 at 7:06
    
you're right, it's just pseudo code... I could edit the post to give you more information –  Larry Sep 28 '09 at 7:15
    
Well, either make it real code, or real pseudo-code. A half-way house isn't very useful. You can't 'pass back' a value as a parameter, parameters are passed by value in C. What's wrong with returning a value? (Yes, I know, you can pass back information by storing it in a place indicated by a parameter if that parameter is a pointer. This isn't the same as passing information out via a parameter itself. –  Charles Bailey Sep 28 '09 at 7:25
    
@Charles Bailey - I suspected that the OP meant ptr when he said buffer and that it was just a copy-paste error that the original name was preserved. @Larry - Some have noted it, but the highest answer still makes the mistake, so I want to note that instead of printf("%i", (int)ptr) you should use printf("%p", ptr) - the "%p" conversion is designed for pointers. Specifically void * pointers, but I don't think the cast to void * is strictly necessary. –  Chris Lutz Sep 28 '09 at 7:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pointers are variables. All variables in C are passed by value. Observe:

void test(int i)
{
    printf("Before: %i\n", i);
    i = 0;
    printf("After:  %i\n", i);
}

int main(void)
{
    int i = 5;
    printf("Before: %i\n", i);
    test(i);
    printf("After:  %i\n", i);
}

Prints:

Before: 5
Before: 5
After:  0
After:  5

Pointers work the same way. Changing the pointer itself doesn't change the caller's pointer. The benefit of pointers is to change the contents of the pointer. You have a few options:

void foo(char **ptr)
{
    if (!(*ptr = malloc(size)))
        printf("error");

    /* code here */

    printf("buffer address: %p\n", ptr);
}

int main()
{
    char *ptr;
    ptr = NULL;

    foo(&ptr);

    printf("buffer address: %p\n", *ptr);
}

Or:

char *foo(char *ptr)
{
    if (!(ptr = malloc(size)))
        printf("error");

    /* code here */

    printf("buffer address: %p\n", ptr);
    return ptr;
}

int main()
{
    char *ptr;
    ptr = NULL;

    ptr = foo(ptr);

    printf("buffer address: %p\n", ptr);
}

Which you use depends on what foo() does. Pick the one that makes the most logical sense.

share|improve this answer
    
I just would remove the argument to foo from the last example, but other than that it works! thanks! –  Larry Sep 28 '09 at 7:43

Others have shown passing a pointer to a pointer, but a simpler option is indicated by your question:

I'm trying to figure out how to allocate a block of memory in a function and return a pointer to that block.

(Emphasis mine.)

When you think about returning something, try using it as the return value :)

char* foo()
{
    char* ptr;
    if (!(ptr = malloc(size)))
        printf("error");

    /* code here */

    printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)ptr);
    return ptr;
}

(You might also consider returning void* instead of char*)

If you already have a return value for some other reason, then it may be appropriate to use the "pointer to a pointer" approach - but if you're not using the original value, just returning something, I believe it's worth keeping things simple if you can.

share|improve this answer
    
ok I changed it :) –  Larry Sep 28 '09 at 7:13
2  
+1, but while we're at it, I wouldn't recommend treating pointer as integer. Not sure how portable it is, but %p sounds better to me. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 28 '09 at 7:24

Well, assuming that (int)buffer should be (int)ptr, you are passing the pointer by value, not reference, so changed made in the function have no effect outside.

You can either return the result:

char *foo()
{
     if (!(ptr = malloc(size)))
          printf("error");

     /* code here */

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)ptr);
     return ptr;
}

int main()
{
     char *ptr;
     ptr = NULL;

     ptr = foo();

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)ptr);
}

or pass the pointer by reference

void foo(char **ptr)
{
     if (!(*ptr = malloc(size)))
          printf("error");

     /* code here */

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)*ptr);
}

int main()
{
     char *ptr;
     ptr = NULL;

     foo(&ptr);

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)ptr);
}
share|improve this answer

Why don't you just return a pointer, much as your question states:

void* foo(void)
{
     void* ptr = malloc(size);
     if (!ptr)
          printf("error");

     /* code here */

     printf("buffer address: %p\n", ptr);
}

int main(void)
{
     char *ptr = foo();

     printf("buffer address: %p\n", (void*)ptr);
}

(Other edits I made were to make sure that all printf of pointer types used %p and were passed a void* type, either by changing the type of a variable or through an explicit cast. I also added initializations to variable declarations where appropriate.)

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1  
+1 for changing %i to %p ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 28 '09 at 7:25

In your function, you reassign your local copy of the pointer. To reassign the pointer in the calling function, you need to pass it the address of the pointer, rather than the address of that the pointer points at.

void foo(char **ptr)
{
     if (!(*ptr = malloc(size)))
          printf("error");

     /* code here */

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)*buffer);
}

int main()
{
     char *ptr;
     ptr = NULL;

     foo(&ptr); // pass address of your ptr, rather than it's value

     printf("buffer address: %i\n", (int)buffer);
}
share|improve this answer

You need to pass a pointer to a pointer to char, like so:

void foo(char **ptr)
{
  // ...
  *ptr = result of malloc;
}

Or even better, return like so:

void char * foo(int memsize)
{

}
share|improve this answer

One more simplification could be:

void *fun()
{
  return(malloc(sizeof(char)));
}


int main()
{
  char *foo = (char *) fun();
  printf("\n%p\n",foo);
}
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