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I would like to wrap the random number distributions from the C++11 standard library with simple functions that take as arguments the distribution's parameters and a generator instance. For example:

double normal(double mean, double sd, std::mt19937_64& generator)
{
    static std::normal_distribution<double> dist;
    return dist(generator, std::normal_distribution<double>::param_type(mean, sd));
}

I want to avoid any hidden state within the distribution object so that each call to this wrapper function only depends on the given arguments. (Potentially, each call to this function could take a different generator instance.) Ideally, I would make the distribution instance static const to ensure this; however, the distribution's operator() is not a const function, so this isn't possible.

My question is this: To ensure there is no hidden state within the distribution, is it 1) necessary and 2) sufficient to call reset() on the distribution each time? For example:

double normal(double mean, double sd, std::mt19937_64& generator)
{
    static std::normal_distribution<double> dist;
    dist.reset();
    return dist(generator, std::normal_distribution<double>::param_type(mean, sd));
}

(Overall, I'm confused about the purpose of the reset() function for the random distributions... I understand why the generator would need to be reset/reseeded at times, but why would the distribution object need to be reset?)

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Thanks for the very helpful answers and comments everyone! – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 20:25
    
I think I'll change my overall strategy after reading the responses: I'll either bind my generator and distribution (which seems to be the intended usage, rather than allowing multiple generators to use the same distribution object), or I may just use the std lib's generators but ignore the distribution functions (after finding out that the distributions are not necessarily portable: stackoverflow.com/questions/14840901/…, so, even with the same seed, I may get different sequences of e.g. normal distribution samples on different platforms). – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 20:28
    
It seems that there are two use cases here: 1) binding an engine and distribution (the intended use), and 2) using multiple engines with one distribution (what I am doing here). I suppose I prefer to think of the distributions as simple stateless functions: you give them an engine, and they return a sample. But I understand the need to treat them as objects so they can cache values for efficiency. It would have been nice if the standard provided, for each distribution, both a stateless function to get just one sample, and an object for generating/caching several samples. – Tyler Streeter Feb 14 '13 at 16:58
    
Also, to summarize the answers below, it seems that there are two potential problems with constantly calling reset() (or recreating the distribution) before generating each sample: 1) it might decrease efficiency because any cached values within the distribution are lost, and 2) (even more serious, if true) it might produce an incorrect distribution. – Tyler Streeter Feb 14 '13 at 17:04
up vote 8 down vote accepted

To ensure there is no hidden state within the distribution, is it 1) necessary

Yes.

and 2) sufficient to call reset() on the distribution each time?

Yes.

You probably don't want to do this though. At least not on every single call. The std::normal_distribution is the poster-child for allowing distributions to maintain state. For example a popular implementation will use the Box-Muller transformation to compute two random numbers at once, but hand you back only one of them, saving the other for the next time you call. Calling reset() prior to the next call would cause the distribution to throw away this already valid result, and cut the efficiency of the algorithm in half.

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1  
Whoa, so what if I have two generator instances, gen1 and gen2, and a std::normal_distribution instance normdist, and I call normdist(gen1) followed by normdist(gen2). Then the second call will depend on gen1 and not gen2? Is that true? – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 16:44
1  
@TylerStreeter: It is true for the libc++ implementation. Table 118 which specifies the behavior of calling a distribution with a urng, specifies behavior only for "successive invocations with the same object g." Successive calls with different urng's is not specified. – Howard Hinnant Feb 13 '13 at 16:59
    
Ok, that's very helpful (and confusing!) Furthermore, for the operator(gen, params) version, the standard specifies behavior only for "successive invocations with the same objects g and p." So if I have two generators (gen1 and gen2) and two sets of normal params (p1 and p2), and I call normdist(gen1, p1) followed by normdist(gen2, p2), the second call may depend on gen1 and p1 and not gen2 and p2 at all. Not what I expected! – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 18:23
    
I was thinking about this a bit more... Say we have just one generator instance g, a std::bernoulli_distribution b, and two different bernoulli parameters p1 and p2. If I call b(g,p1) followed by b(g,p2), both samples may use p1 and ignore p2, and nothing in the standard prevents that. Again, not what I expected. – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 22:44
    
Another example: the sample implementation of std::random_shuffle here en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/random_shuffle (2nd version) may be invalid because, again, the same distribution is reused with different parameters. – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 22:45

Some distributions have internal state. If you interfere with how the distribution works by constantly resetting it you won't get properly distributed results. This is just like calling srand() before every call to rand().

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1  
Are you sure it will affect the distribution and not just the efficiency (see @HowardHinnant's answer)? I'm not sure that your srand() analogy is correct (but correct me if I'm wrong). It seems to me that the distribution's internal state should only be used to improve efficiency, but resetting it should not affect the distribution (like resetting the seed would). – Tyler Streeter Feb 13 '13 at 17:06
    
@TylerStreeter: Although only efficiency is impacted in the libc++ implementation, I don't claim that is a portable result. I doubt the designers or implementors of this library ever imagined someone would want to reset a distribution prior to every call. – Howard Hinnant Feb 13 '13 at 17:17
2  
It might depend on the distribution, but if the first return value out of a newly-created or newly-reset distribution object doesn't have the required distribution, then normally I'd think that means the distribution implementation is flawed. For example, if the first value out of a normal_distribution object isn't normally distributed, that's a bug isn't it? Or are distributions allowed to return incorrectly-distributed data to begin with and then make up for it in the long run, using their stored internal state? If so, what does that mean for users of small amounts of RNG data? – Steve Jessop Feb 13 '13 at 18:02
2  
@TylerStreeter: Unless I was sure of the implementation, constantly recreating the distribution object would make me nervous. The libc++ implementation of uniform_int_distribution is trivial. However not all libc++ distributions have trivial constructors. Though for the libc++ implementation, I still think this is only a matter of efficiency. I don't have an example distribution/implementation in mind where a correctness problem might arise. However I know just enough about this domain to know that one should not abuse the API if one wants to get high quality output. – Howard Hinnant Feb 13 '13 at 18:09
2  
@SteveJessop - a single value does not have a distribution; a collection of values has a distribution, and there is no requirement that you be able to call reset repeatedly without disrupting what the distribution object is doing. – Pete Becker Feb 13 '13 at 19:47

Calling reset() on a distribution object d has the following effect:

Subsequent uses of d do not depend on values produced by any engine prior to invoking reset.

(an engine is in short a generator that can be seeded).

In other words, it clears any "cached" random data that the distribution object has stored and that depends on output that it has previously drawn from an engine.

So, if you want to do that then you should call reset(). The main reason I can think of that you would want to do that is when you are seeding your engine with a known value with the intention of producing repeatable pseudo-random results. If you want the results from your distribution object to also be repeatable based on that seed, then you need to reset the distribution object (or create a new one).

Another reason I can think of is that you are defensively reseeding the generator object because you fear that some attacker may gain partial knowledge of its internal state (as for example Fortuna does). To over-simplify, you can imagine that the quality/security of the generator's data diminishes over time, and that reseeding restores it. Since a distribution object can cache arbitrary amounts of data from the generator, there will be an arbitrary delay between increasing the quality/security of the output of the generator, and increasing the quality/security of the output of the distribution object. Calling reset on the distribution object avoids this delay. But I won't swear to this latter use being correct, because it gets into the realms where I prefer not to make my own judgement about what is secure, if I can possibly rely on peer-reviewed work by an expert :-)

With regard to your code in particular -- if you don't want the output to depend on previous use of the same dist object with different generator objects, then calling reset() would be the way to do that. But I think it's unlikely that calling reset on a distribution object and then using it with new parameters will be any cheaper than constructing a new distribution object with those parameters. So using a static local object seems to me to make your function non-thread-safe for no benefit: you could create a new distribution object each time and the code would likely be no worse. There are reasons for the design in the standard, and you're expected to use a distribution object repeatedly with the same generator. The function you've written, cutting the distribution object out of the interface, discards the benefits of that part of the design in the standard.

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The primary purpose of reset is to get things back to a known state so that you can reproduce a prior sequence or resume where you left off. – Pete Becker Feb 14 '13 at 13:06

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