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Today my boss and I were having a discussion about some code I had written. My code downloads 3 files from a given HTTP/HTTPS link. I had multi-threaded the download so that all 3 files are downloading simultaneously in 3 separate threads. During this discussion, my boss tells me that the code is going to be shipped to people who will most likely be running old hardware and software (I'm talking Windows 2000).

Until this time, I had never considered how a threaded application would scale on older hardware. I realize that if the CPU has only 1 core, threads are useless and may even worsen performance. I have been wondering if this download task is an I/O operation. Meaning, if an API is blocked waiting for information from the HTTP/HTTPS server, will another thread that wants to do some calculation be scheduled meanwhile? Do older OSes do such scheduling?

Another thing he said: Since the code is going to be run on old machines, my application should not eat the CPU. He said use Sleep() calls after CPU intensive tasks to allow other programs some breathing space. Now I was always under the impression that using Sleep() is terrible in any program. Am I wrong? When is using Sleep() justified?

Thanks for looking!

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I seriously doubt the threading will be the scalable-bottlekneck in a wire-download-purposed application such as you're describing. Chance are the pipe saturation will be you're limiting factor. Regarding your bosses "use Sleep()" mantra, ... just.. wow. What does he think your application will be doing while waiting for all that wire-traffic, computing Pi digits? –  WhozCraig Feb 13 '13 at 16:52
    
Who uses Windows 2000, they need to upgrade. :D –  Daniel Lopez Feb 13 '13 at 17:08
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@WhozCraig Do you want to say it doesn't compute PI digits while waiting for I/O? Damn, my view of the world implodes ;-) –  junix Feb 13 '13 at 17:37
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You need to upgrade your boss, seriously. –  Martin James Feb 13 '13 at 17:37
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Even Windows 95 did such scheduling. –  Martin James Feb 13 '13 at 17:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have been wondering if this download task is an I/O operation. Meaning, if an API is blocked waiting for information from the HTTP/HTTPS server, will another thread that wants to do some calculation be scheduled meanwhile? Do older OSes do such scheduling?

Yes they do. That's the joke of having blocked IO. The thread is suspended and other calculations (threads) take place until an event wakes up the blocked thread. That's why it makes completely sense to split it up into threads even for single core machines instead of doing some poor man scheduling between the downloads yourself in a single thread.

Of course your downloads affect each other regarding bandwith, so threading won't help to speedup the download :-)

Another thing he said: Since the code is going to be run on old machines, my application should not eat the CPU. He said use Sleep() calls after CPU intensive tasks to allow other programs some breathing space.

Actually using sleep AFTER the task finished won't help here. Doing Sleep after a certain time of calculation (doing sort of time slicing) before going on with the calculation could help. But this is only true for cooperative systems (e.g. like Windows 3.11). This does not play a role for preemptive systems where the scheduler uses time slicing to allocate calculation time to threads. Here it would be more important to think about lowering the priority for CPU intensive tasks in order to give other tasks precedence...

Now I was always under the impression that using Sleep() is terrible in any program. Am I wrong? When is using Sleep() justified?

This really depends on what you are doing. If you implement sort of busy waiting for a certain flag being set which is set maybe after few seconds it's better to recheck if it's set after going to sleep for a while in order to give up your scheduled time slice instead of just buring CPU power with checking for a flag never being set.

In modern systems there is no sense in introducing Sleep in a calculation as it will only slow down your calculation.

Scheduling is subject to the OS's scheduler. He's the one with the "big picture". In my opinion every approach to "do it better" is only valid inside the scope of a specific application where you have the overview over certain relationships that are not obvious to the scheduler.

Addendum: I did some research and found that Windows supports preemptive multitasking from Windows 95. The Windows NT-line (where Windows 2000 belongs to) always supported preemptive multitasking.

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Sleep() should not be misused for inter-thread comms. Windows API has events, semaphores for signaling. Polling a flag with a Sleep() loop is a classic lame failure. –  Martin James Feb 13 '13 at 17:44
    
@MartinJames Absolutely agree. It was just a try to find an example why using sleep is not considered harmful per se. Maybe there are better ones... –  junix Feb 13 '13 at 17:48
    
Thank you for your answer! Helpful insights indeed! Do any experienced programmers you know/heard of ever use Sleep() in any of their programs? Just curious haha –  Anish Ramaswamy Feb 13 '13 at 18:13
    
Yes, me, for when the spec specifically calls for a pause. –  Martin James Feb 13 '13 at 20:11
    
@AnishRam Me too. There are sometimes reasons for doing this. –  junix Feb 13 '13 at 20:40

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