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var foo = true;

// foo here is not being updated when set to false
if(foo) {
    // and this will always work
    $("#bar").on("click", function() {
        alert("hello");
    });
}

$("#set").on("click", function() {
    alert("foo is now false");
    foo = false;
});
<p id="bar">bar</p>
<input type="button" id="set" value="set to false" />

If I put if(foo) inside function, it works fine.

But the situation here is that there are more conditions to be checked on multiple mouse actions, I would have to write the same if check for each action...

$("#bar").on("mouseover", function() {
    if(foo && bar && baz && qux) {
        // do job A
    }
}).on("mouseout", function() {
    if(foo && bar && baz && qux) {
        // do job B
    }
}).on("click", function() {
    if(foo && bar && baz && qux) {
        // do job C
    }
}).on("dblclick", function() {
    if(foo && bar && baz && qux) {
        // do job D
    }
});

So how can I write the if only once with updated foo to make this work? fiddle here

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It has to be done inside the click if you want it to conditionally do something on each click. –  Kevin B Feb 13 '13 at 17:00

4 Answers 4

You should do like this :

var foo = true;

var check = function() {
     if(foo === true) //Add here your multiple checks
         return true;
    else
        return false;
}

$("#bar").on("click", function() {
    if(check())
        alert("hello");
});

$("#set").on("click", function() {
    alert("foo is now false");
    foo = false;
});

See updated fiddle.

The jquery isn't parsed, but only execute functions, so you must check the var in a function or exec a new function to check the global var.

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uhmmm...saves a little bit work, but I still need to check() on each mouse action. –  user1643156 Feb 13 '13 at 17:23

Move your if condition inside the click handler:

$("#bar").on("click", function() {
    if(foo) { alert("hello");}
});

jsFiddle example

Note that if the conditions are the same in all of your events, you can string the events together in your .on() call like:

$('#bar').on('mouseover mouseout click dblclick', function(e) {
    if(foo && bar && baz && qux) {
        switch(e.type){
            case 'mouseover':
                // thing 1
            break;
            case 'mouseout':
                // thing 2
            break;
            case 'click':
                // thing 3
            break;
            case 'dblclick':
                // thing 4
            break;
        }
    }
 });
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If I put if(foo) inside function, it works fine. But the situation here is that there are more conditions to be checked on multiple mouse actions, I would have to write the same if check for each action... (quotted) –  soyuka Feb 13 '13 at 17:05
1  
@soyuka - not if the conditions are the same. With .on() you can string the events together like $('#element').on('mouseover mouseout click dblclick', function() { –  j08691 Feb 13 '13 at 17:06
    
I thought I did mention this...If I put if(foo) inside function, it works fine. I need a better solution for my real situation here so I don't write if for each mouse action. –  user1643156 Feb 13 '13 at 17:07
    
@user1643156 - see my comment to soyuka above your comment. –  j08691 Feb 13 '13 at 17:07
1  
Again, you didn't note that in your question, however if that's the case then there's no way to reduce your code by any great amount. –  j08691 Feb 13 '13 at 17:16

In your first code example, the if (foo) is only evaluated at initialization time, not at the time of each click so, of course, it only acts on the value of foo when the code runs at init time. If you're going to check the value of foo at the time of the event the check has to be inside the event handler because that is the only code that actually runs at the time of the event.

You have these choices:

  1. Make one set of event handlers and then evaluate foo inside each event handler to call the appropriate code based on the live run-time value of foo.
  2. When you change the value of foo, use .off() to remove the previous event handlers and install new event handlers.
  3. Rather than using the variable, you could change a class name on a parent object and use delegated event handling with a separate event handler for each class name value you might use. In this way, you would use jQuery's delegated event handling logic and selector comparison to decide which event handler should be called at any given time.

You can make option 1 more efficient or more DRY by writing a common function that you use in your multiple event handlers. But, the fact remains that if you want to check the value of a variable at the time of the event, then you have to check it inside the event handler because that is the code that runs at the time of the event handler.

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Well...put multiple if conditions inside event handlers isn't the only option.

Here I wrapped event handlers inside a function, and as @jfriend00 suggested, I invoked off on #bar when set foo=false. Also, added another button to set foo back to true just to illustrate the re-activation (re-bind) of event handlers.

var foo = true;

function bar() {
    if(foo) {
        $("#bar").on("click", function() {
            alert("hello");
        })/*.on("mouseover/dblclick/...")*/;
    }
}
bar();

$("#set_false").on("click", function() {
    alert("foo is now false");
    foo = false;
    // unbind mouse actions
    $("#bar").off();
});

$("#set_true").on("click", function() {
    alert("foo is now true");
    foo = true;
    // re-activate mouse actions
    bar();
});

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/AT6RT/7/

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