Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to decrypt a pass phrase stored in a file. The encryption was done with the Perl::CBC module, but I need to decrypt it for a Python script. Frankly, I don't know much (or anything really) about encryption algorithms.

The pass phrase was encrypted something like this:

use Crypt::CBC;

my $key = '0123456789';
my $iv  = '$KJh#(}q';

my $cipher = Crypt::CBC->new(
    -key    => $key,
    -cipher => 'Blowfish',
    -header => 'none',
    -iv     => $iv,
);

my $passphrase = 'You have decrypted the passphrase.';
my $hex_encrypted = $cipher->encrypt_hex($passphrase);

which gives an encrypted passphrase: 9033c838e4418fbdc50a9fc0813745296d195d59954008f94b2b36a8e65dca959686206960a7828a

Now, I need to use this in a Python script (using Python 2.7). Naively, I was hoping this would work:

from Crypto.Cipher import Blowfish
from binascii import hexlify, unhexlify

perl_pass =  unhexlify('9033c838e4418fbdc50a9fc0813745296d195d59954008f94b2b36a8e65dca959686206960a7828a')
key = '0123456789'
iv  = '$KJh#(}q'
print Blowfish.new(key, Blowfish.MODE_CBC, iv).decrypt(perl_pass)

but that only seems to create a bunch of unprintable junk. I've played around a bit without success. I'm not really sure what I need to do here to get this password decrypted successfully.

share|improve this question
    
Passwords shouldn't be using two-way encryption. Encryption is if you need the data; you don't need to know a password, only compare it to a hash. – Amelia Feb 13 '13 at 20:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The "key" you give to Crypt::CBC is actually a passphrase, from which a 'literal key' is generated; Crypto.Cipher.Blowfish needs that literal key, rather than the passphrase. You can print that generated key in hex from your Perl program, then use it in Python:

use Crypt::CBC;

my $key = '0123456789';
my $iv  = '$KJh#(}q';

my $cipher = Crypt::CBC->new(
    -key    => $key,
    -cipher => 'Blowfish',
    -header => 'none',
    -iv     => $iv,
);

my $passphrase = "You have decrypted the passphrase.";
my $hex_encrypted = $cipher->encrypt_hex($passphrase);

print unpack('H*', $cipher->key()), "\n";

-

$ perl perl_crypt_cbc.pl
781e5e245d69b566979b86e28d23f2c78e938564cd1410f0ec1c1781466a6738bab0a6ed984c75ab34c68bbf7558077714043c5bdb959e46

-

from Crypto.Cipher import Blowfish
from binascii import hexlify, unhexlify

perl_pass = unhexlify("9033c838e4418fbdc50a9fc0813745296d195d59954008f94b2b36a8e65dca959686206960a7828a")

key = unhexlify("781e5e245d69b566979b86e28d23f2c78e938564cd1410f0ec1c1781466a6738bab0a6ed984c75ab34c68bbf7558077714043c5bdb959e46")
iv  = '$KJh#(}q'
print Blowfish.new(key, Blowfish.MODE_CBC, iv).decrypt(perl_pass)

-

python python_crypt_cbc.py 
You have decrypted the passphrase.

Note that there will be a few unprintable characters at the end: Blowfish-encrypted strings must be a multiple of 8 bytes, so Perl silently pads it. The byte it's padded with is the length of the padding: in this case, six bytes of padding, so each of them is 0x06. You can easily remove them:

from Crypto.Cipher import Blowfish
from binascii import hexlify, unhexlify

perl_pass = unhexlify("9033c838e4418fbdc50a9fc0813745296d195d59954008f94b2b36a8e65dca959686206960a7828a")

key = unhexlify("781e5e245d69b566979b86e28d23f2c78e938564cd1410f0ec1c1781466a6738bab0a6ed984c75ab34c68bbf7558077714043c5bdb959e46")
iv  = '$KJh#(}q'
num_padding = ord(Blowfish.new(key, Blowfish.MODE_CBC, iv).decrypt(perl_pass)[-1])

print Blowfish.new(key, Blowfish.MODE_CBC, iv).decrypt(perl_pass)[:(-1*num_padding)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That was just what I need to get my script working. – gr001032 Feb 13 '13 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.