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I can't think of a better title... please edit if you can!

class AbstractGUIBase
{
...
};
class GUIConcrete : public AbstractGUIBase
{
...
};

class AbstractApplicationBase
{
 AbstractGUIBase *mGUI;
};

class MyApplication : public AbstractApplicationBase
{
 GUIConcrete *mGUI;
};

This is basically the setup I have... an application base-class provides common functionality including a reference to a GUI base-class instance mGUI. mGUI is only ever instantiated in MyApplication or other concrete sub-classes.

I don't want to re-declare mGUI in both classes because I end up doing something like super::mGUI = mGUI = new ConcreteGUI(). But I also don't want to have to cast mGUI every time it's used in MyApplication.

Is there a normal patter here? I was thinking you could template AbstractApplicationBase on the GUI class type but I don't especially like template programming.

I'm using MSVC++2008 so no fancy modern stuff is available.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll try to strip away the details of your model and focus on the following abstract design:

                struct A                    struct DA : A 
                {                           {
                };                          };

//==============================================================================

                struct B                    struct DB : B 
                {                           { 
                    A* p;                       DA* pD; // Avoid this
                };                          };

Now what you are trying to do is to avoid adding an extra member variable to DB, and be able to treat the pointer p inherited from B as if it were of type DA*.

You can structure classes B and DB this way:

struct B
{
private:
    A* p;
public:
    B(A* _p) : p(_p) { }
    A* get_p() { return p; }
}

struct DB : B
{
public:
    B(DA* _p) : B(_p) { }
    DA* get_p() { return static_cast<DA*>(A::get_p()); }
}

Superclass B will hold a pointer of type A*. This pointer is set at construction time. If the constructor is invoked while creating an instance of DB, a pointer to an object of type DA will be stored. DB provides a function get_p() that hides B's version of get_p() and returns a (properly casted) pointer of type DA*.

Due to this design, the static_cast<> in DB::get_p() is guaranteed to be safe (unless you use virtual inheritance, in which case you should use the less efficient dynamic_cast<>).

Internal operations of B would access the pointer p directly. Clients of B would retrieve it through a call to B::get_p(). Inside of DB, and for clients of DB as well, you would access the object pointed to by p by retrieving the pointer through function B::get_p(), rather than directly dereferencing p.

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Shouldn't B(DA* _p) : p(_p) { } be DB(DA* _p) : B(_p) { } instead? –  Remy Lebeau Feb 13 '13 at 17:44
    
@RemyLebeau: Of course. Fixed, thank you! –  Andy Prowl Feb 13 '13 at 17:45
    
So basically every time in DA I'd need access to DB*, extra function call invoking a static/dynamic cast is needed. Is there a way to do this, avoiding the cast? Maybe if we declare a union of A* and DA* for p, instead of just A*? –  gt6989b Feb 13 '13 at 17:51
1  
@gt6989b: If you use a static_cast<>, it's very likely that the compiler will inline that call, resulting in no overhead. If a dynamic_cast<> is used then yes, this will affect performance. I would not go for a union, because you would have to mention DA inside of B, and B is likely to be part of a framework that should not know anything about DA. –  Andy Prowl Feb 13 '13 at 17:55
    
So basically, I'm being a bit idealistic in my quest for a clean, non-casted solution? Well-written answer by the way. –  John Feb 13 '13 at 20:54

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