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The title is possibly worded incorrectly, so please show me the correct terms.

I've got a base class called DAL_Base that accepts a generic type T. The type T comes from our many classes in our Business Objects layer, and each one of them has a corresponding Data Access Layer.

DAL_Base accepts parameters that allows me to specify the Stored Procedure names and parameters that I use to call methods to select, insert, and update records.

What I currently seem to be stuck on is that I can't seem to find a way to instantiate a new instance of my DAL_Base, which needs to initialize the various variables.

Partial listing:

public class DAL_Base<T> where T : IDisposable, new() {

  public DAL_Base<T>() { // <= ERROR HERE
    // initialize items that will be used in all derived classes
  }

}

The error VS2010 is giving me is:

Invalid token '(' in class, struct, or interface member declaration

I have tried creating constructors without parenthesis, but that is not useful either.

When I search, all I seem to be able to return are ways to create instances of my generic type T. That was easy to find out how to do!

MSDN's An Introduction to C# Generics did not seem to cover this, either.

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1  
A somewhat better title (since you ask for one) would be: Writing an instance constructor of a generic class or struct The same syntax is used for a static constructor of course, if you need one. Constructors are the method-like members that run when people write a new object expression. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '13 at 18:36
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You should not have angle brackets (< and >) on the constructor.

public class DAL_Base<T> where T : IDisposable, new()
{
    public DAL_Base()
    {
    }
}
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Beat me to the answer! :) –  CodingGorilla Feb 13 '13 at 17:46
    
Aw man! That was so simple. I never tried that one. Thanks. –  jp2code Feb 13 '13 at 17:48
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You should not have the generic type argument in your constructor:

public class DAL_Base<T> where T : IDisposable, new() {

  public DAL_Base() { // <= this should work
    // initialize items that will be used in all derived classes
  }

}

Since you have decorated the class itself with the type argument, the type is available in the constructor:

  public DAL_Base() {
     var listOfObjects = new List<T>();
  }
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That is exactly the sort of thing I am looking to do, too! –  jp2code Feb 13 '13 at 17:50
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public DAL_Base() { // <= NO ERROR HERE :)

The class is generic, the constructor is not. You tried to add an additional generic parameter to the constructor, which it cannot have.

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