Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I implemented Levenshtein Distance in a pretty standard way in F# as an exercise

let lastchar (s:string) = s.Substring(s.Length-1, 1)
let lastchar_substring (s:string) len = s.Substring(len-1, 1)

let rec levdist (sa:string) (sb:string) alen blen = match alen, blen with
    | -1, -1 -> levdist sa sb sa.Length sb.Length
    | 0, 0 -> 0
    | _ , 0 -> alen
    | 0, _  -> blen
    | _ -> List.min [ (* How do I make this tail recursive...? *)
            (levdist sa sb (alen-1) blen) + 1;
            (levdist sa sb alen (blen-1)) + 1;
            (levdist sa sb (alen-1) (blen-1)) + 
                 match (lastchar_substring  sa alen), (lastchar_substring sb blen) with 
                      | x, y when x = y -> 0 
                      | _ -> 1
        ])

However, I don't see a straightforward way to convert the List.min call to be tail recursive. We're not simply doing some additional, independent computations after the recursive call; instead we're choosing the result of multiple recursive calls.

Is there a way to elegantly convert this to be tail recursive?

(I can easily convert the +1 to be tail recursive)

share|improve this question
1  
I think I see a solution... but it seems super convoluted. Instead of calling levdist 3 times and then taking the min, we can call levdist with (alen-1 blen) and pass it some continuation that calls levdist (alen blen-1), and so forth. The min op will be done in the continuations. –  jameszhao00 Feb 13 '13 at 18:23
    
I wouldn't worry too much about making it tail recursive - your algorithm appears to require exponential work, so you'll never be in danger of overflowing the stack. –  kvb Feb 13 '13 at 18:26
1  
Just as an exercise :) You can memoize this (non tail-recursive) function to be n*m (n^2 ish). –  jameszhao00 Feb 13 '13 at 18:28
1  
As an aside, you can do better by not filling in the entire matrix. That's how I use it to align long dna sequences, you get something like O(n log m). –  nlucaroni Feb 13 '13 at 20:05
    
@nlucaroni How do you get nlogm time complexity? –  jameszhao00 Feb 13 '13 at 20:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In general, when you want to turn code into a tail-recursive form, you have two options:

  • If your recursive function calls itself only once, you can use accumulator paramter.
  • If it calls itself multiple times, you need to use continuations

As Jeffrey says, continuation passing style looks a bit ugly, because you have to transform all functions to take another function and return the result by calling it. You can, however, make this a bit nicer because continuations are monads and so you can use computation expressions.

If you define the following computation builder:

// Computation that uses CPS - when given a continuation
// it does some computation and return the result
type Cont<'T, 'R> = (('T -> 'R) -> 'R)

type ContBuilder() = 
  member x.Return(v) : Cont<'T, 'R> = fun k -> k v
  member x.ReturnFrom(r) = r
  member x.Bind(vf:Cont<'T1, 'R>, f:'T1 -> Cont<'T2, 'R>) : Cont<'T2, 'R> = 
    fun k -> vf (fun v -> f v k)

let cont = ContBuilder()

Then you can rewrite the solution from @gradbot as follows (and get rid of the explicit construction of lambda functions):

let levdist (sa:string) (sb:string) = 
    let rec levdist_cont (sa:string) (sb:string) alen blen = cont {
        match alen, blen with
        | -1, -1 -> return! levdist_cont sa sb sa.Length sb.Length 
        |  0,  0 -> return 0
        |  _,  0 -> return alen
        |  0,  _ -> return blen
        |  _ -> 
            let! l1 = levdist_cont sa sb (alen - 1) (blen    )
            let! l2 = levdist_cont sa sb (alen    ) (blen - 1) 
            let! l3 = levdist_cont sa sb (alen - 1) (blen - 1) 
            let d = if (lastchar_substring sa alen) = (lastchar_substring sb blen) then 0 else 1
            return (min (l1 + 1) (min (l2 + 1) (l3 + d))) }

    levdist_cont sa sb -1 -1 (fun x -> x)
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent practical demonstration of monads. Looking forward to your talk here in New York on the 23rd. –  Shredderroy Feb 14 '13 at 20:18
    
Thanks! BTW: The talk is actually going to be on Monday 25th (there were some troubles finding a room, but everything is booked now): meetup.com/nyc-fsharp –  Tomas Petricek Feb 15 '13 at 2:18

If you want to take the minimum over a set of recursive calls, you can't do this tail recursively. You need to do the min operation after all the calls.

You can convert any computation so that it uses tail calls by converting to continuation passing style.

Continuation passing style often looks convoluted (to me), but I suspect once you get used to it it's reasonably straightforward.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to be tail recursive. –  jameszhao00 Feb 13 '13 at 18:23
    
(Sorry, I thought you wanted a tail call to List.min. Then I noticed you said "recursive".) –  Jeffrey Scofield Feb 13 '13 at 18:24
1  
My comment to the original question proposed a tail recursive way to do a min... but seems rather inelegant. –  jameszhao00 Feb 13 '13 at 18:25

The basic idea of continuation passing is that you are "hiding" future work in a function.

let lastchar (s:string) = s.Substring(s.Length-1, 1)
let lastchar_substring (s:string) len = s.Substring(len-1, 1)

let levdist (sa:string) (sb:string) = 
    let rec levdist_cont (sa:string) (sb:string) alen blen cont =
        match alen, blen with
        | -1, -1 -> levdist_cont sa sb sa.Length sb.Length cont
        |  0,  0 -> cont 0
        |  _,  0 -> cont alen
        |  0,  _ -> cont blen
        |  _ -> 
            levdist_cont sa sb (alen - 1) (blen    ) (fun l1 ->
            levdist_cont sa sb (alen    ) (blen - 1) (fun l2 ->
            levdist_cont sa sb (alen - 1) (blen - 1) (fun l3 -> 
                let d = if (lastchar_substring sa alen) = (lastchar_substring sb blen) then 0 else 1
                cont (min (l1 + 1) (min (l2 + 1) (l3 + d)))
                )))

    levdist_cont sa sb -1 -1 (fun x -> x)

levdist "guisuifgh" "sfg"
|> printf "%A"

output

6
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.