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I am pretty confident that I should be able to use a delegate with a non-static method, but the below is giving me an error:

public class TestClass
{
    private delegate void TestDelegate();
    TestDelegate testDelegate = new TestDelegate(MyMethod);

    private void MyMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foobar");
    }
}

The error I am getting is:

A field initializer cannot reference the non-static field, method, or property

If I make MyMethod static, everything works fine. Was I simply wrong in thinking I could use a delegate with a non static method (I am sure I remember doing so in the past).

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You can use a delegate with a non-static method, but it doesn't mean you can initialize a field this way. –  Anton Kovalenko Feb 13 '13 at 18:05
    
OK, do I need to do something different when initializing an instance of the delegate? –  JMK Feb 13 '13 at 18:06
1  
Something different, like assigning to it in your class constructor instead of initializing. –  Anton Kovalenko Feb 13 '13 at 18:08
    
Aah that works, so I just can't initialize it outside of the scope of a method, if it's not static? –  JMK Feb 13 '13 at 18:09
1  
Yep (and that's what the error message says) –  Anton Kovalenko Feb 13 '13 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

How about TestDelegate testDelgate = MyMethod;

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Same error, Resharper had faded the rest of the code out anyway. –  JMK Feb 13 '13 at 18:08

Answering this as I had to 'show more comments' and do a double take before I realised what the actual answer was.

Error:

A field initializer cannot reference the non-static field, method, or property

The solution is to initialise the delegate inside the constructor.

I couldn't actually find this in the C# Language Reference itself, and a lot of the stock examples are static methods.

i.e.

public class TestClass
{
    private delegate void TestDelegate();
    TestDelegate testDelegate;

    public TestClass()
    {
        testDelegate = new TestDelegate(MyMethod);
    }

    private void MyMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Foobar");
    }
}
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