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Note - here I'm using the term "injecting service into an entity" for both passing a service to constructor or passing it as an argument to a method

a) What is the difference between handlers and those actions/operations that are also triggered by domain operations, but are instead handled within the domain itself? Perhaps the difference is that the former ( ie handlers, or more precisely their actions ) don't represent domain concepts, while the latter represent domain concepts?

b)

you do not need to inject anything into your domain entities.

Reason for introducing Domain Events is so we don't have to inject services into domain entities. But since injecting Domain Services DS into entities is also not very desirable, couldn't in such cases handlers ( ie their actions ) be domain concepts ( ie instead of injecting DS into an entity, handler would make a call to this DS )?

c) If indeed handlers could also replace injecting DSs into domain entities, are there also situations where handlers could replace the DS itself?

d)

handler classes do not belong in the domain model.

Do handlers belong to the Infrastructure layer? What about those handlers that call DS?

UPDATE:

a)

The central difference is that a domain event handler is invoked after the fact.

But action/operation A ( the one which we handle within a domain and not within a handler ) triggered by the operation OP may also occur after the fact ( ie after OP is finished ).So couldn't we argue that main difference between these two types of actions is that A represents a domain concept, while those actions that are performed by handlers don't represent domain concepts?

b) Just to be sure - so would an answer my original question be that in some cases instead of entities calling DSs, we can have handlers call appropriate DSs?

c)

Domain events can eliminate need for domain services in cases such as above

So answer to c) is that in some cases handlers can indeed replace DS? But if so, couldn't we argue that in such cases handlers ( ie their actions ) are domain concepts?

d)

Handlers aren't really part of your domain because all they do is delegate to the appropriate infrastructure service or domain service. They are just a form of glue, similar to an application service. They can still be declared in the domain project, but usually they don't need to be.

I.

Handlers aren't really part of your domain because all they do is delegate to the appropriate infrastructure service or domain service.

Just to be sure - I assume by "delegate to" you mean that instead of entity calling appropriate DS or infrastructure service, we delegate the job of calling a particular service to a handler?

II.

They can still be declared in the domain project, but usually they don't need to be.

As you noted in c), in some cases handlers can replace the DS itself ( ie they don't call a DS, but in fact perform the required operations by themselves ). In such cases, couldn't we argue that handlers are domain concepts and as such belong in a domain layer?!

SECOND UPDATE:

D - II

As you noted in c), in some cases handlers can replace the DS itself ( ie they don't call a DS, but in fact perform the required operations by themselves ). In such cases, couldn't we argue that handlers are domain concepts and as such belong in a domain layer?!

In those cases I would say that the handler has two responsibilities - that of wiring up the event and performing the operation. The wiring part isn't a domain concept, however the operation itself is.

a) So in those cases handler would be violating SRP?

b)

The wiring part isn't a domain concept, however the operation itself is.

Should in such case handler be put into domain layer?

2) Assuming action A returns a value, how do we decide whether it's better to execute A by injecting ( note - here I'm using the term "injecting service into an entity" for both passing a service to constructor or passing it as an argument to a method ) service S ( which in turn executes A ) into an entity or to use a Domain Event instead ( which in turn would call methods on S )?

Perhaps decision depends on whether or not some domain code needs the result of A for some further processing?

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Domain events are simply interesting things that have happened in your domain that other systems may be interested in. You just need some way to expose those events to the other systems. You can use them within your domain but that is not their primary purpose. –  Eben Roux Feb 14 '13 at 5:39
    
@Eben Roux: So primary purpose of Domain Events is to notify only OTHER systems of interesting things that happened within a domain? –  user437291 Feb 14 '13 at 16:31
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That is correct. It may not be the only responsibility but is definitely is the primary. Domains services can probably handle should be able to handle your domain concepts / tasks well enough. –  Eben Roux Feb 14 '13 at 17:56
    
@Eben Roux "Domains services can probably handle should be able to handle your domain concepts / tasks well enough." I'm not sure I follow your reasoning, since my question wasn't so much whether handler should perform an action instead of a domain service DS, but more of a whether handler should invoke DS instead of us injecting that DS into an entity?! –  user437291 Feb 14 '13 at 20:53
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That will come down to preference but passing in the DS to an entity method is fine and that is what I would probably do. –  Eben Roux Feb 15 '13 at 4:12
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

a) The central difference is that a domain event handler is invoked after the fact. The event has already occurred and is immutable. Therefore, the handled can only do things in response to something that has already happened. Moreover, a handler can cause behavior that isn't part of the responsibility of the source entity, such as sending an email.

b) Domain events are a pattern for ensuring a greater degree of encapsulation and decoupling. For example, the fact that an email should be sent after some action can be implemented in a few ways. One way is to pass an email service to an entity. The entity would then call the email service when needed. Another way is to have the calling application service call the email service. The problem with the first approach is that now the entity is coupled to the email service and violates SRP - the domain is now dealing with technical issues. The problem with the second approach is that it places the responsibility of knowing when to send an email on the application service. Domain events address both of these issues since now the entity decides when the event occurs and the handlers decide what to do with the event.

c) Domain events can eliminate need for domain services in cases such as above, however they don't eliminate need for domain services in all cases. There are cases where an entity may need a domain service in order to invoke behavior in the first place. This is where domain events can't help since they only address after-the fact scenarios.

d) Handlers aren't really part of your domain because all they do is delegate to the appropriate infrastructure service or domain service. They are just a form of glue, similar to an application service. They can still be declared in the domain project, but usually they don't need to be.

UPDATE

a) That is not always the case. It is acceptable for a domain event handler to invoke another domain operation. This is a way of doing event-driven architecture within a single process.

b) Yes, a domain event handler can invoke a domain service. Having a handler call a domain service in response to an event is a way to add behaviors to entities in a decoupled way - a form of the observer pattern.

c) Normally, a handler would delegate to something in order to perform a domain operation. The handler itself is only the glue. However, you can place domain logic into the handler in which case it would act like a domain service.

d1) Yes. A handler would be a simple class with a constructor dependency on some service. When it handles an event it calls the appropriate method on said service.

d2) In those cases I would say that the handler has two responsibilities - that of wiring up the event and performing the operation. The wiring part isn't a domain concept, however the operation itself is.

UPDATE 2

a) Yes I would say so. Depending on how your domain events are implemented, the handler could just be a lambda - it doesn't need to be a class.

b) If the handler is delegating to domain services then it can go into the domain layer. If it makes use of infrastructural services, it may need to go into the infrastructure layer. Also, as stated in a), the handler doesn't need to be a class, it could be a lambda.

2) A domain event is something notable that happened in the domain. Use a domain event where you can envision subscribers being interested in that event. This event can be used to invoke additional behavior in the domain or to be published externally. The main observation is that it is an immutable event in the past tense.

Perhaps decision depends on whether or not some domain code needs the result of A for some further processing?

This is true. If a domain operation needs the result of a domain service S in order to continue executing its behavior then that service should be passed to that behavioral method. An entity cannot receive the result of processing of a published domain event.

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Can you see my update? –  user437291 Feb 13 '13 at 19:22
    
Can you see my second update? –  user437291 Feb 14 '13 at 16:31
    
thank you for your help –  user437291 Feb 14 '13 at 17:42
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