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I have this long line:

kvm1.example.corp,18:18:48,x86_64,16,11,11,0,0,0,0,0,11,0,4.6,99056376,4980736,4980736,5450000000,1,s-75-VM,460000000.,0.385304090422,262144,0,0,3,743,0,2,v-30-VM,450000000.,0.376927914543,1048576,1,0,6,7676,4765,3,r-80-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,208,0,5,i-2-81-VM,10000000.,0.00837617587873,1048576,1,0,0,0,0,6,r-83-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,156,0,7,i-3-82-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,8,r-85-VM,410000000.,0.343423211028,131072,0,0,0,208,0,11,i-3-84-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,12,i-2-79-VM,690000000.,0.577956135633,524288,0,0,2,0,0,13,r-87-VM,420000000.,0.351799386907,131072,0,0,0,156,0,14,i-3-88-VM,730000000.,0.611460839147,524288,0,0,2,0,0

I'm trying to get output like this

1,s-75-VM,460000000.,0.385304090422,262144,0,0,3,743,0,
2,v-30-VM,450000000.,0.376927914543,1048576,1,0,6,7676,4765,
3,r-80-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,208,0,
5,i-2-81-VM,10000000.,0.00837617587873,1048576,1,0,0,0,0,
6,r-83-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,156,0,
7,i-3-82-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,
8,r-85-VM,410000000.,0.343423211028,131072,0,0,0,208,0,
11,i-3-84-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,
12,i-2-79-VM,690000000.,0.577956135633,524288,0,0,2,0,0,
13,r-87-VM,420000000.,0.351799386907,131072,0,0,0,156,0,
14,i-3-88-VM,730000000.,0.611460839147,524288,0,0,2,0,0

I'm not sure which strategy I should take to add a new line after the 9th comma after removing the header?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simpler with sed:

$ sed -r 's/([^,]+,){18}//;s/(([^,]+,){10})/\1\n/g' file 
1,s-75-VM,460000000.,0.385304090422,262144,0,0,3,743,0,
2,v-30-VM,450000000.,0.376927914543,1048576,1,0,6,7676,4765,
3,r-80-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,208,0,
5,i-2-81-VM,10000000.,0.00837617587873,1048576,1,0,0,0,0,
6,r-83-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,156,0,
7,i-3-82-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,
8,r-85-VM,410000000.,0.343423211028,131072,0,0,0,208,0,
11,i-3-84-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,
12,i-2-79-VM,690000000.,0.577956135633,524288,0,0,2,0,0,
13,r-87-VM,420000000.,0.351799386907,131072,0,0,0,156,0,
14,i-3-88-VM,730000000.,0.611460839147,524288,0,0,2,0,0
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awk -F, '{for (col = 19; col < NF; col += 10) {
           for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) { printf("%s,", $(col+i)); }
           printf "\n"; }
         }'
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Thank you, I'm trying hard to keep up with awk, great work! thanks a bunch! –  Deano Feb 13 '13 at 18:46

In bash:

(
  IFS="," read -a fields <<< "$longline"
  set -- "${fields[@]:18}"
  IFS=","
  while (( $# > 0 )); do
    echo "${*:1:10}"
    shift 10
  done
)

The (...) creates a subshell so that we don't need to worry about preserving the old values of IFS and the shell arguments ($@ and $*).

The first line splits the long line using ',' as the field separator and stores the fields in an array.

The second line skips the first 18 fields (all header elements) and stores the rest in the shell arguments, which can be accessed individually using $1, $2, etc or collectively as $@ or $*.

The third line makes the field separator ',' for the rest of while loop, specifically for the parameter expansion in the echo command.

"${*:1:10}" takes the first 10 shell arguments, and joins them with the value of IFS.

shift 10 discards the first 10 arguments (that we just printed).

$# is the number of shell arguments, which decreases by 10 after each shift operation; the loop continues as long as there are still arguments to process.

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in perl:

perl -F, -lane 'for($min=18;$min<scalar(@F);$min+=10){print join ",",@F[$min..$min+10]}'

tested below:

> echo "kvm1.example.corp,18:18:48,x86_64,16,11,11,0,0,0,0,0,11,0,4.6,99056376,4980736,4980736,5450000000,1,s-75-VM,460000000.,0.385304090422,262144,0,0,3,743,0,2,v-30-VM,450000000.,0.376927914543,1048576,1,0,6,7676,4765,3,r-80-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,208,0,5,i-2-81-VM,10000000.,0.00837617587873,1048576,1,0,0,0,0,6,r-83-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,156,0,7,i-3-82-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,8,r-85-VM,410000000.,0.343423211028,131072,0,0,0,208,0,11,i-3-84-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,12,i-2-79-VM,690000000.,0.577956135633,524288,0,0,2,0,0,13,r-87-VM,420000000.,0.351799386907,131072,0,0,0,156,0,14,i-3-88-VM,730000000.,0.611460839147,524288,0,0,2,0,0" | perl -F, -lane 'for($min=18;$min<scalar(@F);$min+=10){print join ",",@F[$min..$min+10]}' 
1,s-75-VM,460000000.,0.385304090422,262144,0,0,3,743,0,2
2,v-30-VM,450000000.,0.376927914543,1048576,1,0,6,7676,4765,3
3,r-80-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,208,0,5
5,i-2-81-VM,10000000.,0.00837617587873,1048576,1,0,0,0,0,6
6,r-83-VM,430000000.,0.360175562786,131072,0,0,0,156,0,7
7,i-3-82-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,8
8,r-85-VM,410000000.,0.343423211028,131072,0,0,0,208,0,11
11,i-3-84-VM,710000000.,0.59470848739,524288,0,0,0,0,0,12
12,i-2-79-VM,690000000.,0.577956135633,524288,0,0,2,0,0,13
13,r-87-VM,420000000.,0.351799386907,131072,0,0,0,156,0,14
14,i-3-88-VM,730000000.,0.611460839147,524288,0,0,2,0,0,
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