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I have a project in which we often use Integer.parseInt() to convert a String to an int. When something goes wrong (for example, the String is not a number but the letter a, or whatever) this method will throw an exception. However, if I have to handle exceptions in my code everywhere, this starts to look very ugly very quickly. I would like to put this in a method, however, I have no clue how to return a clean value in order to show that the conversion went wrong.

In C++ I could have created a method that accepted a pointer to an int and let the method itself return true or false. However, as far as I know, this is not possible in Java. I could also create an object that contains a true/false variable and the converted value, but this does not seem ideal either. The same thing goes for a global value, and this might give me some trouble with multithreading.

So is there a clean way to do this?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 39 down vote accepted

You could return an Integer instead of an int, returning null on parse failure.

It's a shame Java doesn't provide a way of doing this without there being an exception thrown internally though - you can hide the exception (by catching it and returning null), but it could still be a performance issue if you're parsing hundreds of thousands of bits of user-provided data.

EDIT: Code for such a method:

public static Integer tryParse(String text) {
  try {
    return new Integer(text);
  } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
    return null;
  }
}

Note that I'm not sure off the top of my head what this will do if text is null. You should consider that - if it represents a bug (i.e. your code may well pass an invalid value, but should never pass null) then throwing an exception is appropriate; if it doesn't represent a bug then you should probably just return null as you would for any other invalid value.

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1  
How does this help? The call site will require: <b>temp=tryParse(...); if (temp!=Null) { target=temp; } else { do recovery action };</b> with a probable throw exception in the recovery part. In the original formulation the call site requires <b>try target=(...).parseInt; catch (...) { do recovery action }</b> with a trivial throw exception in the recovery being implemented by simply removing the catch clause. How does the proposed solution make this simpler to understand (it has a magic trick) or reduce the amount of code in any way? –  Ira Baxter Sep 28 '09 at 9:53
11  
It's generally cleaner to code to check for null references than it is to handle exceptions on a regular basis. –  Adam Maras Sep 28 '09 at 9:55
    
It's even cleaner to avoid passing nulls as values but instead somehow indicate that en error has occured; exceptions shouldn't be used for flow control. –  Esko Sep 28 '09 at 11:49
    
You should use Integer's factory method valueOf(String s). –  Steve Kuo Sep 28 '09 at 17:10
1  
@Steve Kuo: Why? Where's the benefit? They both create a new Integer each time? If anything, I'm tempted to use Integer.parseInt and let autoboxing take care of it, to take advantage of the cache for small values. –  Jon Skeet Sep 28 '09 at 18:33
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What behaviour do you expect when it's not a number?

If, for example, you often have a default value to use when the input is not a number, then a method such as this could be useful:

public static int parseWithDefault(String number, int defaultVal) {
  try {
    return Integer.parseInt(number);
  } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
    return defaultVal;
  }
}

Similar methods can be written for different default behaviour when the input can't be parsed.

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To avoid handling exceptions use a regular expression to make sure you have all digits first:

if(value.matches("\\d+") {
    Integer.parseInt(value);
}
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thank you for your answer. i read through most of the answers on this page, i personally had written the try/catch solution. however here's my issue, albeit small, with that solution. most IDEs will choke with analysing the flow of your code when you have a try/catch inside a loop. that's why a solution without the try/catch was what i needed. –  victor n. Mar 2 at 3:58
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May be you can use something like this:

public class Test {
public interface Option<T> {
	T get();

	T getOrElse(T def);

	boolean hasValue();
}

final static class Some<T> implements Option<T> {

	private final T value;

	public Some(T value) {
		this.value = value;
	}

	@Override
	public T get() {
		return value;
	}

	@Override
	public T getOrElse(T def) {
		return value;
	}

	@Override
	public boolean hasValue() {
		return true;
	}
}

final static class None<T> implements Option<T> {

	@Override
	public T get() {
		throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
	}

	@Override
	public T getOrElse(T def) {
		return def;
	}

	@Override
	public boolean hasValue() {
		return false;
	}

}

public static Option<Integer> parseInt(String s) {
	Option<Integer> result = new None<Integer>();
	try {
		Integer value = Integer.parseInt(s);
		result = new Some<Integer>(value);
	} catch (NumberFormatException e) {
	}
	return result;
}

}

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I like your solution using the maybe pattern. Very haskelly ;) –  rodrigoelp Oct 31 '13 at 4:10
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After reading the answers to the question I think encapsulating or wrapping the parseInt method is not necessary, maybe even not a good idea.

You could return 'null' as Jon suggested, but that's more or less replacing a try/catch construct by a null-check. There's just a slight difference on the behaviour if you 'forget' error handling: if you don't catch the exception, there's no assignment and the left hand side variable keeps it old value. If you don't test for null, you'll probably get hit by the JVM (NPE).

yawn's suggestion looks more elegant to me, because I do not like returning null to signal some errors or exceptional states. Now you have to check referential equality with a predefined object, that indicates a problem. But, as others argue, if again you 'forget' to check and a String is unparsable, the program continous with the wrapped int inside your 'ERROR' or 'NULL' object.

Nikolay's solution is even more object orientated and will work with parseXXX methods from other wrapper classes aswell. But in the end, he just replaced the NumberFormatException by an OperationNotSupported exception - again you need a try/catch to handle unparsable inputs.

So, its my conclusion to not encapsulate the plain parseInt method. I'd only encapsulate if I could add some (application depended) error handling as well.

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My Java is a little rusty, but let me see if I can point you in the right direction:

public class Converter {

    public static Integer parseInt(String str) {
        Integer n = null;

        try {
            n = new Integer(Integer.tryParse(str));
        } catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
            // leave n null, the string is invalid
        }

        return n;
    }

}

If your return value is null, you have a bad value. Otherwise, you have a valid Integer.

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The OP wants the conversion result (as a reference) plus an indication that the conversion was successful (or not). –  yawn Sep 28 '09 at 9:29
1  
@yawn: And a null reference gives exactly that indication. –  Jon Skeet Sep 28 '09 at 9:33
    
@John Skeet: correct but I read his intent differently. He wrote something like using an intermediate object to differentiate between success/failure + value. Coming from a C++ background I figured if he wanted to use null (instead of an object) he would not have asked the question in the first place. –  yawn Sep 28 '09 at 9:36
    
There's a major difference between "value" and "object". A null reference is a clean value, but not an object. –  Jon Skeet Sep 28 '09 at 10:09
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You could also replicate the C++ behaviour that you want very simply

public static boolean parseInt(String str, int[] byRef) {
    if(byRef==null) return false;
    try {
       byRef[0] = Integer.parseInt(prop);
       return true;
    } catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
       return false;
    }
}

You would use the method like so:

int[] byRef = new int[1];
boolean result = parseInt("123",byRef);

After that the variable result it's true if everything went allright and byRef[0] contains the parsed value.

Personally, I would stick to catching the exception.

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They way I handle this problem is recursively. For example when reading data from the console:

Java.util.Scanner keyboard = new Java.util.Scanner(System.in);

public int GetMyInt(){
    int ret;
    System.out.print("Give me an Int: ");
    try{
        ret = Integer.parseInt(keyboard.NextLine());

    }
    catch(Exception e){
        System.out.println("\nThere was an error try again.\n");
        ret = GetMyInt();
    }
    return ret;
}
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There is Ints.tryParse() in Guava. It doesn't throw exception on non-numeric string, however it does throw exception on null string.

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You can use a Null-Object like so:

public class Convert {

    @SuppressWarnings({"UnnecessaryBoxing"})
    public static final Integer NULL = new Integer(0);

    public static Integer convert(String integer) {

        try {
            return Integer.valueOf(integer);
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            return NULL;
        }

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Integer a = convert("123");
        System.out.println("a.equals(123) = " + a.equals(123));
        System.out.println("a == NULL " + (a == NULL));

        Integer b = convert("onetwothree");
        System.out.println("b.equals(123) = " + b.equals(123));
        System.out.println("b == NULL " + (b == NULL));

		Integer c = convert("0");
		System.out.println("equals(0) = " + c.equals(0));
		System.out.println("c == NULL " + (c == NULL));

    }

}

The result of main in this example is:

a.equals(123) = true
a == NULL false
b.equals(123) = false
b == NULL true
c.equals(0) = true
c == NULL false

This way you can always test for failed conversion but still work with the results as Integer instances. You might also want to tweak the number NULL represents (≠ 0).

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What if 'String integer' is the String literal "0"? You'll never know if there was invalid input. –  Bart Kiers Sep 28 '09 at 9:19
1  
A correct parse of 0 will be ≠ NULL but equals(0). –  yawn Sep 28 '09 at 9:21
    
I guess that depends on whether the == operator for two Integers compares values or references. If it compares values, the problem exists. If it compares references, it would work in a way equivalent to my answer. –  Adam Maras Sep 28 '09 at 9:21
    
Why the downvote? My answer is correct and offers the advantage (over null) that you always deal with a valid instance of Integer (instead of null) relieving you of having to deal with NPEs. –  yawn Sep 28 '09 at 9:25
    
Distinguishing null from a real integer is useful though. You should be testing the result for nullity, to know whether the parse succeeded or not. Hiding that behind and otherwise usable object is a recipe for problems, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Sep 28 '09 at 9:32
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I would suggest you consider a method like

 IntegerUtilities.isValidInteger(String s)

which you then implement as you see fit. If you want the result carried back - perhaps because you use Integer.parseInt() anyway - you can use the array trick.

 IntegerUtilities.isValidInteger(String s, int[] result)

where you set result[0] to the integer value found in the process.

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This is somewhat similar to Nikolay's solution:

 private static class Box<T> {
  T me;
  public Box() {}
  public T get() { return me; }
  public void set(T fromParse) { me = fromParse; }
 }

 private interface Parser<T> {
  public void setExclusion(String regex);
  public boolean isExcluded(String s);
  public T parse(String s);
 }

 public static <T> boolean parser(Box<T> ref, Parser<T> p, String toParse) {
  if (!p.isExcluded(toParse)) {
   ref.set(p.parse(toParse));
   return true;
  } else return false;
 }

 public static void main(String args[]) {
  Box<Integer> a = new Box<Integer>();
  Parser<Integer> intParser = new Parser<Integer>() {
   String myExclusion;
   public void setExclusion(String regex) {
    myExclusion = regex;
   }
   public boolean isExcluded(String s) {
    return s.matches(myExclusion);
   }
   public Integer parse(String s) {
    return new Integer(s);
   }
  };
  intParser.setExclusion("\\D+");
  if (parser(a,intParser,"123")) System.out.println(a.get());
  if (!parser(a,intParser,"abc")) System.out.println("didn't parse "+a.get());
 }

The main method demos the code. Another way to implement the Parser interface would obviously be to just set "\D+" from construction, and have the methods do nothing.

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You could roll your own, but it's just as easy to use commons lang's StringUtils.isNumeric() method. It uses Character.isDigit() to iterate over each character in the String.

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To avoid an exception, you can use Java's Format.parseObject method. The code below is basically a simplified version of Apache Common's IntegerValidator class.

public static boolean tryParse(String s, int[] result)
{
    NumberFormat format = NumberFormat.getIntegerInstance();
    ParsePosition position = new ParsePosition(0);
    Object parsedValue = format.parseObject(s, position);

    if (position.getErrorIndex() > -1)
    {
        return false;
    }

    if (position.getIndex() < s.length())
    {
        return false;
    }

    result[0] = ((Long) parsedValue).intValue();
    return true;
}

You can either use AtomicInteger or the int[] array trick depending upon your preference.

Here is my test that uses it -

int[] i = new int[1];
Assert.assertTrue(IntUtils.tryParse("123", i));
Assert.assertEquals(123, i[0]);
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In some cases you should handle parsing errors as fail-fast situations, but in others cases, such as application configuration, I prefer to handle missing input with default values using Apache Commons Lang 3 NumberUtils.

int port = NumberUtils.toInt(properties.getProperty("port"), 8080);
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