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I have an entity that is used to store some global app settings. These settings can be edited via an admin HTML page, but very rarely change. I have only one instance of this entity (a singleton of sorts) and always refer to this instance when I need access to the settings.

Here's what it boils down to:

class Settings(ndb.Model):
    SINGLETON_DATASTORE_KEY = 'SINGLETON'

    @classmethod
    def singleton(cls):
        return cls.get_or_insert(cls.SINGLETON_DATASTORE_KEY)

    foo = ndb.IntegerProperty(
        default =  100,
        verbose_name = "Some setting called 'foo'",
        indexed = False)

@ndb.tasklet
def foo():
    # Even though settings has already been fetched from memcache and
    # should be available in NDB's in-context cache, the following call
    # fetches it from memcache anyways. Why?
    settings = Settings.singleton()

class SomeHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.toplevel
    def get(self):
        settings = Settings.singleton()
        # Do some stuff
        yield foo()
        self.response.write("The 'foo' setting value is %d" % settings.foo)

I was under the assumption that calling Settings.singleton() more than once per request handler would be pretty fast, as the first call would most probably retrieve the Settings entity from memcache (since the entity is seldom updated) and all subsequent calls within the same request handler would retrieve it from NDB's in-context cache. From the documentation:

The in-context cache persists only for the duration of a single incoming HTTP request and is "visible" only to the code that handles that request. It's fast; this cache lives in memory.

However, AppStat is showing that my Settings entity is being retrieved from memcache multiple times within the same request handler. I know this by looking at a request handler's detailed page in AppStat, expanding the call trace of each call to memcache.Get and looking at the memcahe key that is being reteived.

I am using a lot of tasklets in my request handlers, and I call Settings.singleton() from within the tasklets that need access to the settings. Could this be the reason why the Settings entity is being fetched from memcache again instead of from the in-context cache? If so, what are the exact rules that govern if/when an entity can be fetched from the in-context cache or not? I have not been able to find this information in the NDB documentation.


Update 2013/02/15: I am unable to reproduce this in a dummy test application. Test code is:

class Foo(ndb.Model):
    prop_a = ndb.DateTimeProperty(auto_now_add = True)

def use_foo():
    foo = Foo.get_or_insert('singleton')
    logging.info("Function using foo: %r", foo.prop_a)

@ndb.tasklet
def use_foo_tasklet():
    foo = Foo.get_or_insert('singleton')
    logging.info("Function using foo: %r", foo.prop_a)

@ndb.tasklet
def use_foo_async_tasklet():
    foo = yield Foo.get_or_insert_async('singleton')
    logging.info("Function using foo: %r", foo.prop_a)

class FuncGetOrInsertHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        for i in xrange(10):
            logging.info("Iteration %d", i)
            use_foo()

class TaskletGetOrInsertHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.toplevel
    def get(self):
        logging.info("Toplevel")
        use_foo()
        for i in xrange(10):
            logging.info("Iteration %d", i)
            use_foo_tasklet()

class AsyncTaskletGetOrInsertHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.toplevel
    def get(self):
        logging.info("Toplevel")
        use_foo()
        for i in xrange(10):
            logging.info("Iteration %d", i)
            use_foo_async_tasklet()

Before running any of the test handlers, I make sure that the Foo entity with keyname singleton exists.

Contrary to what I am seeing in my production app, all of these request handlers show a single call to memcache.Get in Appstats.


Update 2013/02/21: I am finally able to reproduce this in a dummy test application. Test code is:

class ToplevelAsyncTaskletGetOrInsertHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.toplevel
    def get(self):
        logging.info("Toplevel 1")
        use_foo()
        self._toplevel2()

    @ndb.toplevel
    def _toplevel2(self):
        logging.info("Toplevel 2")
        use_foo()
        for i in xrange(10):
            logging.info("Iteration %d", i)
            use_foo_async_tasklet()

This handler does show 2 calls to memcache.Get in Appstats, just like my production code.

Indeed, in my production request handler codepath, I have a toplevel called by another toplevel. It seems like a toplevel creates a new ndb context.

Changing the nested toplevel to a synctasklet fixes the problem.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a difference between get and get_or_insert? –  tesdal Feb 14 '13 at 0:07
    
Nope. Using using get_by_id() instead of get_or_insert() still yields to multiple fetches from memcache within a single request handler. –  Pascal Bourque Feb 14 '13 at 14:03
1  
get_or_insert() runs in a transaction, which supposedly bypasses memcache. So this doesn't make any sense... –  David Bennett Feb 14 '13 at 19:45
    
I am unable to reproduce this in an isolated test app. Calling get_or_insert() multiple times from sub-functions and tasklets end up with a single memcache.Get call in AppStats. So there has to be something else in my production code that leads to this singleton being fetched from memcache more than once within a single handler. Investigating... –  Pascal Bourque Feb 15 '13 at 15:54
    
How exactly are you testing this? The memcache only gets populated the first time you get the data (not when you put it) so to test whether you are seeing a cached access you need to write it, read it, and read it again (in a separate request). The second read should use memcache. –  Guido van Rossum Feb 15 '13 at 16:11
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like a toplevel creates a new ndb context.

Exactly, each handler with a toplevel decorator have its own context and therefore a separate cache. You can take a look to the code for toplevel in the link below, in the function documentation states that toplevel is "A sync tasklet that sets a fresh default Context".

https://code.google.com/p/googleappengine/source/browse/trunk/python/google/appengine/ext/ndb/tasklets.py#1033

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