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I have a friend who said that all static methods should be synchronized in the context of a Java web application. Is that true? I have read many other stack overflow pages regarding this. What I have come to believe is that you only need to synchronize if you have:

  1. Multiple Threads (As in a Sevlet Container with a thread pool)
  2. Single ClassLoader
  3. Shared data between threads, whether it is Session data or static member data.
  4. Shared data must be mutable. Read only data is ok to share.

Based on this I think that static members should be synchronized, but not static methods.

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class ThreadTest {

    static String staticString = "";

    // This static method is safe b/c it only uses local data.
    // It does not use any shared mutable data.
    // It even uses a string builder.
    static String safeStaticMethod(String in) {
        // This also proves that StringBuilder is safe
        // When used locally by a thread.
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append("Hello: ");
        sb.append(in);
        return sb.toString();
    }

    // This static method is not safe b/c it updates and reads
    // shared mutable data among threads.
    // Adding synchronized will make this safe.
    static String unsafeStaticMethod(String in) {
        staticString = in;
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        sb.append("Hello: ");
        sb.append(staticString);
        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThreadTest test = new ThreadTest();
        test.staticMethodWithLocalData();
        test.staticMethodWithStaticData();
    }

    public void staticMethodWithLocalData() {

        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);
        final int iterations = 100000;

        executor.submit(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                for (int index = 0; index < iterations; ++index) {
                    if (!safeStaticMethod("Thread1").equals("Hello: Thread1")) {
                        System.out.println("safeStaticMethod at " + index);
                    }
                }
            }
        });

        executor.submit(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                for (int index = 0; index < iterations; ++index) {
                    if (!safeStaticMethod("Thread2").equals("Hello: Thread2")) {
                        System.out.println("safeStaticMethod at " + index);
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public void staticMethodWithStaticData() {

        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);
        final int iterations = 100000;

        executor.submit(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                for (int index = 0; index < iterations; ++index) {
                    if (!unsafeStaticMethod("Thread1").equals("Hello: Thread1")) {
                        System.out.println("unsafeStaticMethod at " + index);
                    }
                }
            }
        });

        executor.submit(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                for (int index = 0; index < iterations; ++index) {
                    if (!unsafeStaticMethod("Thread2").equals("Hello: Thread2")) {
                        System.out.println("unsafeStaticMethod at " + index);
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

Does this code prove the point?

EDIT: This is only some throwaway code I hacked up to prove the point.

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8  
Writing thread-safe code is far more complicated than slapping synchronized in random places. –  SLaks Feb 13 '13 at 20:32
1  
As a side note, your safeStaticMethod as written would still be safe using a StringBuffer, as the buffer is not shared between threads. it is local to that particular method invocation. –  Charlie Feb 13 '13 at 20:34
1  
To elaborate on the above: there are basically no "if X then Y" rules that are universally valid for writing threadsafe programs. (Most of the ones you hear can end up needlessly reducing concurrency for your app.) –  millimoose Feb 13 '13 at 20:34
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/5173399 –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Feb 13 '13 at 20:34
    
For example, serialising accesses to random "atoms" (field values) of shared data with synchronized may be insufficient - it may still be incorrect if two related fields are accessed in the wrong order or if a single change should affect both of them consistently. (Recall the classical example of transferring money between bank accounts.) There's also different ways of sharing data in a thread-safe way that may be more appropriate. (Like retrieving consistent read-only snapshots instead of accessing it directly, or using lock-free iterators that survive concurrent modification.) –  millimoose Feb 13 '13 at 20:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, not all static methods need to be synchronized. Your list is basically complete as far as I can see. Be particularly careful when the static method either

  1. accesses a static member that is mutable, or
  2. gets passed a reference to an object that can be modified.

I think it goes without saying that 1 (having threads in the first place) is a precondition, since without threads synchronize makes no sense.

I've never heard 2, so I don't know for sure if it's a consideration.

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No that's not true and I'm sure it would be detrimental. Not every application needs to be concurrent, and even in applications that do need to be concurrent, not every piece of code has to be.

As more evidence, look at the source of String. There are many static methods in there, but I could only find one synchronized method, and that one isn't even static.

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2  
As far as String not being synchronized, it's because String is immutable - largely because immutable objects are read-only and therefore inherently safe (point 4 in the original question). String is actually one of the best examples of a class designed explicitly to avoid the use of synchronized and still be safe. –  Matt Feb 13 '13 at 20:36
1  
Yes that's true, he pointed that out with point 4, but the question is about if all static methods need to be synchronized and this is an example showing, "no, they do not" –  Daniel Kaplan Feb 13 '13 at 20:37
1  
Oh, indeed. I understand now - good example :) –  Matt Feb 13 '13 at 20:37
1  
+1 for 'detrimental'. It seems to me that locking a class to provide exclusive access could slow down your application if the method is used a lot. –  Jess Feb 13 '13 at 20:43

Static methods should almost never be synchronized in a webapp. Unless you are 100% sure that the only people who will ever use the application are your 3 person accounting team, and willing to be red in the face if it takes off company-wide and all of the sudden grinds to a near halt.

Creating a global, blocking, shared resource is a total failure in scalability! It's also going to cause you lots of headaches and likely lock you into a Terracotta style solution if you end up needing to cluster the application server.

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In a web application(like one build using the servlet/JSP), you should always avoid making a method as synchronized as it challenges the whole philosophy of mutli-thread accessibility. In place, always try to place the only necessary code, which needs to be accessed one by one, inside the synchronized block.

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