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I mean, I want to create a class method in my module that will be used by the class who includes the module. They are in separated files.

By far I have something like this:

module Base
  def self.all
    puts "All Users"
  end
end

class User
  include Base
end

But I'm getting: NoMethodError: undefined methodall' for User:Class`

Can you please explain the problem and if what I'm doing is a bad practice or going against any principle?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can extend the module in your class, your code should be like this:

module Base
  def all
    puts "All Users"
  end
end

class User
  extend Base
end

When you do something like this:

module MyModule
  def self.module_method
    puts "module!"
  end
end

You're actually adding the method in the module itself, you could call the previous method like this:

MyModule.module_method

There is a way to just include the module and get the behaviour that you want, but I don't think this could be considered the "way to go". Look at the example:

module Base
  def self.included(klass)
    def klass.all
      puts "all users"
    end
  end
end

class User
  include Base
end

But like I said, if you can go with the extend class method, it is a better suit.

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Thanks for all! This and @Anton's answer solved the problem. –  waldyr.ar Feb 13 '13 at 21:01

Following Ricardo's answer, consider an idiom common among Ruby programmers - enclose your module's class methods into inner module, called ClassMethods(that's a mouthful, I know), and use and Module#included hook to extend base class with ClassMethods module.

More information here: http://www.railstips.org/blog/archives/2009/05/15/include-vs-extend-in-ruby/

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