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The below is a simple java class file that checks if the file provided by the user is under the home directory or not. It throws an exception when the file is not under the home directory.

public class A {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
     if (new A().processArgs(args[0]) {
        throw Exception("Not under home directory");
     }
  }

  // A simple method to check if the file is at home directory
  private boolean processArgs(String s) {
    File f = new File(s);
    String userHome = System.getProperty("user.home");
    if (s.startsWith(userHome) && f.exists() && additionalLogic())
      return true;  
    else
      return false;
  }
  // Additional business Logic
  private boolean additionalBusinessLogic() {
    // Do wonderful things.
  }
}

I want to write a simple Junit test case for testing the java class. Primary concern to test is the additional Business logic method. Is there a way I can bypass the check where directory must be under user home directory.

I am not comfortable in adding logic in my main class to make it aware of the Junit classes. Is there a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
You should be running the JUnit tests to test your main class - not the other way around. Hence, your test case must know about the program, but the program does not know about the test. –  weltraumpirat Feb 13 '13 at 21:19
1  
Just write a separate test method that is called by jUnit. Junit uses annotations,so just mark the appropriate method. –  OldProgrammer Feb 13 '13 at 21:20
    
You example shows, that unit test should be written early, not after the code is finished, as many people do. You now saw, that code has to be designed to be testable. Interfaces like in Sami Solution helps go read that. –  AlexWien Feb 13 '13 at 23:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While there's nothing wrong with fab's solution, I decided to write another:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        // TODO: Should check args length
        Validator validator = new Validator();
        validator.validateArgs(args[0]);
    }
}

public interface Configuration {
    public String getHomeDirectory();
}

public class DefaultConfiguration implements Configuration {
    public String getHomeDirectory() {
        String home = System.getProperty("user.home");
        if (home == null) {
            throw new RuntimeException("User home directory is not set!");
        }
        return home;
    }
}

public class Validator {
  private Configuration configuration;

  public Validator() {
     this(new DefaultConfiguration());
  }

  public Validator(Configuration configuration) {
     this.configuration = configuration;
  }

  // A simple method to check if the file is at home directory
  public void validateArgs(String s) {
    File f = new File(s);
    if (!s.startsWith(configuration.getHomeDirectory()) || !f.exists() || !additionalBusinessLogic())
      throw new RuntimeException("Not under home directory!");
  }

  // Additional business Logic
  private boolean additionalBusinessLogic() {
     // TODO...
     return true;
  }
}

public class ValidatorTest {
  @Test
  public void validateValidArgsTest() {
     final String homeDirectory = ".."; // TODO
     String existingFile = homeDirectory + ".."; // TODO
     new Validator(new Configuration() {
       public String getHomeDirectory() {
          return homeDirectory;
       }
     }).validateArgs(existingFile);
  }

  @Test(expected = RuntimeException.class)
  public void validateInvalidArgsTest() {
     String existingFile = ".."; // TODO
     new Validator(new Configuration() {
       public String getHomeDirectory() {
          return "-INVALID PATH-";
       }
     }).validateArgs(existingFile);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for taking it one step further –  fschmengler Feb 13 '13 at 22:06
    
Your frist sentence is wrong, fabs solution is far away from working, calling class methods from static main, etc. Even would not compile –  AlexWien Feb 13 '13 at 22:18
    
But despite of your first sentence, its a professional solution. It shows much more then the OP has asked about. It will be a good use fro him. –  AlexWien Feb 13 '13 at 23:01
    
Fab's solution didn't have static main when I wrote this (and looks like he changed it again) I'm unsure, if this compiles either since I wrote it with notepad. –  Sami Korhonen Feb 14 '13 at 0:36

You don't need to make the class aware of the test to make it more testable. You just need to decouple the additional logic from the i/o stuff, which will also result in a better design:

public class A {
  private WonderfulThingsDoer wonderfulService;

  public void main(String args[]) {
     wonderfulService = new WonderfulThingsDoer();
     if (processArgs(args[0]) {
        throw Exception("Not under home directory");
     }
  }

  // A simple method to check if the file is at home directory
  private boolean processArgs(String s) {
    File f = new File(s);
    String userHome = System.getProperty("user.home");
    if (s.startsWith(userHome) && f.exists() && additionalBusinessLogic())
      return true;  
    else
      return false;
  }
  // Additional business Logic
  private boolean additionalBusinessLogic() {
    return wonderfulService.doWonderfulThings();
  }
}

public class WonderfulThingsDoer {
  public boolean doWonderfulThings() {
    // Do wonderful things.
    return true;
  }
}

Voilá, extracted a testable unit.

share|improve this answer
    
a main method which is not static ??? –  AlexWien Feb 13 '13 at 21:56
    
if that's why you downvoted: this was copied and pasted from the original source code, sorry for not reviewing everything that carefully. –  fschmengler Feb 13 '13 at 22:04
    
Still far away from working, It gets more complicated if the code shall run, the OP simplified a bit. You cannot call processArgs from main, because processArgs is not static. –  AlexWien Feb 13 '13 at 22:17
    
you are right but I don't see why I should correct every "simplification" just to prove my point, it should be clear enough. Pseudo code question => pseudo code answer ;) –  fschmengler Feb 13 '13 at 22:26
    
That worked perfectly well. Thank you for the that. It really decoupled my logic from the main class. And made it more testable. –  JourneyMan Feb 13 '13 at 22:40

Simply don't hard code the "user.home"

Create a field home, that you change in the unit code, to point to the test directory:

public class A {

      private static String homeDir;
      protected static void setHomeDir(String home) {
        this.homeDir = home;
      }    

      public static void main(String args[]) {
         if (homeDir == null) {
              homeDir = System.getProperty("user.home");
         }
         A a = new A();
         if (a.processArgs(args[0]) {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException("Not under home directory");
         }
      }

      // A simple method to check if the file is at home directory
      protected boolean processArgs(String s) {
        File f = new File(s);

        if (s.startsWith(A.homeDir) && f.exists() && additionalLogic())
          return true;  
        else
          return false;
      }
      // Additional business Logic
      private boolean additionalBusinessLogic() {
        // Do wonderful things.
      }
    }

Now in the Unit Test, set the homeDir to your test directory

public void testMainHomeExisting() {
    A a = new A;
    String home = "./testdata/";
    A.setHomeDir(home);
    String[] args = new String[]{home}; // hope this compiles otherwise fix it
    // no assert needed here, if test fails, an Exception is thrown
    A.main(args);
}

Now a test case for home not existing

public void testMainHomeNotExisting() {
    A a = new A;
    String home = "./notExistingFooBarFooFoo/";
    A.setHomeDir(home);
    String[] args = new String[]{home}; // hope this compiles otherwise fix it
    // no assert needed here, if test fails, an Exception is thrown
    try {
       A.main(args);
       // if code works the next line should not be reached:
       fail("Expected IllegalArgumentException");
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
       // as expected got IllegalArgumentException
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a very good point. I agree. That provides for better extensibility to my current code. Thanks –  JourneyMan Feb 13 '13 at 22:42

I would change the method you want to test...

  1. Remove the access modifier
  2. Pass in the File variable you need to be able to do your logic

boolean additionalBusinessLogic(File f)

This will allow a test class in the same package to invoke the method. If you leave it private, no other classes will be able to call it.

Once you can call the method you want to test, the test class is easy...

public class MyClassTest {
    @Test
    public void additionalBusinessLogic_shouldFoo_whenSomeCondition() {
        // setup
        A a = new A();
        File mockFile = mock(File.class);
        // other setup stuff

        // execute
        boolean result = a.additionalBusinessLogic(mockFile);

        // assert
        // verify whatever you need to
    }
}

For a good mocking framework, I would suggest Mockito.

share|improve this answer

I see no reason to call main.

When you're writing a unit test, you want them to be modular enough to call without relying too much on external methods - and what you can't call you can mock, using something like EasyMock, PowerMock or Mockito.

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Just make a Test for the core business method additionalBusinessLogic only. You don't need to call main.

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