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I have a dictionary with tuples as keys (containing a string and an int) and floats as values. An example:

first = {}
first['monkey', 1] = 130.0 
first['dog', 2] = 123.0-
first['cat', 3] = 130.0
first['cat', 4] = 130.0
first['mouse', 6] = 100.0

Now, I need to make a new dictionary, which has the original dictionary key's second element as it's key. The new dictionary's value should be the the place it stands if the keys were sorted. Added to this, there are two exceptions:

  1. If two dicts have values that are equal, but have different strings in the key, the one with the lowest int in the key should be placed higher.

  2. If two dicts have values that are equal, but have different ints in the key, they should be placed equal in the new dict and all get the same values.

So, the new dictionary should be as the following:

second[1] = 3
second[2] = 2
second[3] = 4
second[4] = 4
second[6] = 1

I know that it's ignorant to ask someone else to solve my problem without giving my code for it. But i'm simply don't know how to approach the problem. I would be glad if you could provide me with an explanation how would you solve this problem , or even give me a pseudocode of the algorithm.

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3  
Learn something new everyday. Didn't know you could have a tuple for a dictionary key. –  Hoopdady Feb 13 '13 at 21:22
    
@Hoopdady tuples are immutable so it's OK –  wRAR Feb 13 '13 at 21:23
    
Is there supposed to be a - after first['dog', 2] = 123.0- –  Hoopdady Feb 13 '13 at 21:30
    
I also feel like I have the knowledge to solve this, I'm just not completely sure what's being asked. –  Hoopdady Feb 13 '13 at 21:35
    
Have to agree with Hoppdady. I had no idea the parentheses could be omitted when using a tuple for a key. –  StoryTeller Feb 13 '13 at 21:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
import itertools as IT

first = {
    ('monkey',1): 130.0,
    ('dog',2): 123.0,
    ('cat', 3): 130.0,
    ('cat', 4): 130.0,
    ('mouse', 6): 100.0
    }

counter = 0
ordered = sorted(first, key = lambda k: (first[k], k[1], k[0]))

second = {}
for key, group in IT.groupby(ordered, first.__getitem__):
    # group = list(group)
    # print(key, group)
    # (100.0, [('mouse', 6)])
    # (123.0, [('dog', 2)])
    # (130.0, [('monkey', 1), ('cat', 3), ('cat', 4)])
    previous = None
    for name, num in group:
        if name != previous:
            counter += 1
        second[num] = counter
        previous = name

print(second)

yields

{1: 3, 2: 2, 3: 4, 4: 4, 6: 1}

Explanation:

The first step is to order the (name, num) keys of first according to the associated values. However, in case of ties, the num is used. If there is still a tie, the name is used to break the tie.

In [96]: ordered = sorted(first, key = lambda k: (first[k], k[1], k[0]))

In [97]: ordered
Out[97]: [('mouse', 6), ('dog', 2), ('monkey', 1), ('cat', 3), ('cat', 4)]

Next, we need to group the items in ordered since there are special rules when the value first[k] is the same. The grouping can be achieved using itertools.groupby:

In [99]: for key, group in IT.groupby(ordered, first.__getitem__):
   ....:     print(key, list(group))
   ....:     
   ....:     
(100.0, [('mouse', 6)])
(123.0, [('dog', 2)])
(130.0, [('monkey', 1), ('cat', 3), ('cat', 4)])

itertools.groupby is collecting the items in ordered into bunches according to the value of the key, first.__getitem__(item). For example,

In [100]: first.__getitem__(('monkey', 1))
Out[100]: 130.0

In [101]: first.__getitem__(('cat', 3))
Out[101]: 130.0

first.__getitem__(item) is just a fancy way of writing first[item]. The reason why I use first.__getitem__ is because itertools.groupby expects a function for its second argument, and first.__getitem__ is the function that fits the bill.


Finally, we iterate through each group. Basically, we want to do this:

for name, num in group:
    counter += 1
    second[num] = counter

except that, when the names are equal, we do not want to advance the counter. So to check if the names are equal, it helps to store the previous name:

previous = None
for name, num in group:
    if name != previous:
        counter += 1
    ...
    previous = name   

Warning: Note that rkd91's code and my code produce different answers for

first = {
    ('monkey',1): 130.0,
    ('dog',2): 123.0,
    ('cat', 3): 129.0,
    ('cat', 4): 130.0,
    ('mouse', 6): 100.0
    }

probably due to different interpretations of the specifications. I'll leave it to you do decide which is yielding the desired output.

@rdk91's code yields

{1: 4, 2: 2, 3: 5, 4: 3, 6: 1}

my code yields

{1: 4, 2: 2, 3: 3, 4: 5, 6: 1}
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Thank you very much! It's even more than i actally hoped to get. I'm sorry if i didn't explain my question clearly , it might be because English isn't my native language :d. –  geekkid Feb 14 '13 at 21:40

1) Get a list of key-value tuples using first_list = first.items()

2) Create a custom comparator function that will sort the list according to your criteria.

3) Sort the list using first_list.sort(comparator)

4) Build your new dictionary from the sorted list.

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rob@rivertam:~/Programming$ cat sorter.py 
first = {}
first['monkey', 1] = 130.0
first['dog', 2] = 123.0
first['cat', 3] = 130.0
first['cat', 4] = 130.0
first['mouse', 6] = 100.0

# Get the keys of first, sorted by the value (ascending order), and then by the integer in the key (descending order) if two keys have the same value

s = sorted(first, key=lambda x: x[0])
s.reverse()
s = sorted(s, key=lambda x: first[x])

# Loop through these, and create a new list where the key is the integer in the old key, and the value is the position in the sorted order.

last_val = None
last = (None, None)
index = 0
new_dict = {}

for item in s:
    if not ((first[item] == last_val) and (item[1] != last[1]) and item[0] == last[0]):
        # When we have the same value, the same string but a different integer from the last key, consider it to be the same position in the sorted order.
        index += 1
    new_dict[item[1]] = index
    last_val = first[item]
    last = item

print new_dict
rob@rivertam:~/Programming$ python sorter.py 
{1: 3, 2: 2, 3: 4, 4: 4, 6: 1}
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