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My code has a couple instances where functions react only slightly differently when encountering a T&& or const T&, however the functions themselves are quite long (note that T is just some object type). For instance:

void push_back(const T& newt){
    /* code block X */
    new (ptr) T(newt);
    /* code block Y */
}

void push_back(T&& newt){
    /* code block X */
    new (ptr) T(std::move(newt));
    /* code block Y */
}

is it possible to write something along the lines of this pseudo-code:

template<typename S>
void push_back(S newt){
    /* code block X */
#if decltype(newt)==T&&
    new (ptr) T(std::move(newt));
#else
    new (ptr) T(newt);
#endif
    /* code block Y */
}

Or is there a better way to write nearly identical move and copy functions?

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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use std::forward() in the T&& function and discard the const T& function:

template <typename T>
void push_back(T&& newt){
    /* code block X */
    new (ptr) typename std::remove_reference<T>::type(std::forward<T>(newt));
    /* code block Y */
}

std::forward() will pass on newt exactly as it was passed to push_back(). Resulting in:

  • the copy constructor of T being used if push_back() is passed an lvalue, or
  • the move constructor of T being used if push_back() is passed an rvalue.

See online demo at http://ideone.com/HjOrap .

Note that this is correct if push_back() is a free standing function or a member function of non-template class. If it is a template class member function then the function itself must accept a template type in addition to the class template type as this behaviour depends upon T being a deduced type.

See Universal References by Scott Meyers.

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I don't think I quite understand what you mean. While this is fine for doing something like {string t="hi"; push_back(std::move(t));}, this won't compile if you try doing {string t="hi"; push_back(t);}; the compiler gives some weird error. The idea is to invoke the copy constructor or move constructor given different inputs. –  Aggieboy Feb 13 '13 at 22:01
    
@Aggieboy, updated answer. –  hmjd Feb 13 '13 at 22:16
    
this is the code that won't compile: docs.google.com/file/d/0B7yGmb99B5encmVuREx3eUVXUEE/edit (btw, is there a better way to post code?) –  Aggieboy Feb 13 '13 at 22:16
1  
@Aggieboy, a version of your code that compiles but has a runtime error: ideone.com/BrB6gK You might want to post another question for the runtime error, I am unsure and don't have much experience with placement new. –  hmjd Feb 13 '13 at 22:22
    
Got it to work with the std::forward! Thank you. –  Aggieboy Feb 14 '13 at 0:15
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