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I read the: How to create a buffer matrix in MATLAB for continuous measurements?, question. I wanted to know if its possible to store values in sequence instead of in reverse as in the question, without resorting to fliplr (flip left to right) after each iteration?

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Front to back:

buffSize = 10;
circBuff = nan(1,buffSize);
for newest = 1:1000;
    circBuff = [circBuff(2:end) newest]
end

circBuff = 991 992 993 994 995 996 997 998 999 1000

Back to front:

buffSize = 10;
circBuff = nan(1,buffSize);
for newest = 1:1000;
    circBuff = [newest circBuff(1:end-1)]
end

circBuff = 1000 999 998 997 996 995 994 993 992 991

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buffSize = 10;
circBuff = nan(1,buffSize);
for newest = 1:1000;
    circBuff = [circBuff(2:end), newest]
   %circBuff = [newest circBuff(1:end-1)] %reverse direction

end

I have tested this, it takes no appreciable time to run in MATLAB. The profiler did not find any bottlenecks with the code.

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Sorry, but I think an answer deserves a little more than a copy and paste from the already referenced question, even if it was you who answered. – Sebastian Jun 20 '13 at 10:01

I just uploaded my solution for a fast circular buffer to

http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/47025-circvbuf-m

The main idea of this circular buffer is constant and fast performance and avoiding copy operations when using the buffer in a program:

% create a circular vector buffer
    bufferSz = 1000;
    vectorLen= 7;
    cvbuf = circVBuf(int64(bufferSz),int64(vectorLen));

% fill buffer with 99 vectors
    vecs = zeros(99,vectorLen,'double');
    cvbuf.append(vecs);

% loop over lastly appended vectors of the circVBuf:
    new = cvbuf.new;
    lst = cvbuf.lst;
    for ix=new:lst
       vec(:) = cvbuf.raw(:,ix);
    end

% or direct array operation on lastly appended vectors in the buffer (no copy => fast)
    new = cvbuf.new;
    lst = cvbuf.lst;
    mean = mean(cvbuf.raw(3:7,new:lst));

Check the screenshot to see, that this circular buffer has advantages if the buffer is large, but the size of data to append each time is small as the performance of circVBuf does NOT depend on the buffer size, compared to a simple copy buffer.

The double buffering garanties a predictive time for an append depending on the data to append in any situation. In future this class shall give you a choice for double buffering yes or no - things will speedup, if you do not need the garantied time. speedtest

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For anyone who is looking to create a buffer “Matrix” instead of an Array(nx1 or 1xn matrix), the code can be modified to:

buffSize = 10;
 circBuff = nan(3,buffSize);
 for newest = 1:1000;
 circBuff = [circBuff(1,2:end) newest; circBuff(2,2:end) newest; circBuff(3,2:end) newest; ]
 end

:D

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