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Say I have a function:

f :: Int -> (Rational, Integer)
f b = ((toRational b)+1,(toInteger b)+1)

I want to abstract away the (+1) like so:

f :: Int -> (Rational, Integer)
f b = (h (toRational b)
      ,h (toInteger b))
    where h = (+1)

This wont work obviously, but if I specify the type signature it will work:

f :: Int -> (Rational, Integer)
f b = (h (toRational b)
      ,h (toInteger b))
    where h :: Num a => a -> a
          h = (+1)

Say I now want to further abstract the function by passing h as a parameter:

f :: Num a => Int -> (a -> a) -> (Rational, Integer)
f b g = (h (toRational b)
        ,h (toInteger b))
    where h :: Num a => a -> a
          h = g

I get an error that the inner a is not the same a as the outer one.

Does anyone know how to write this function correctly? I want to pass a polymorphic function g to f and use it polymorphically.

I have encountered this situation multiple times now in very different projects, and I could not find a good solution.

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1  
Welcome to the world of higher ranked types! –  Ingo Feb 14 '13 at 8:31
5  
"This wont work obviously" Actually, it's not obvious that this won't work: (+1) is polymorphic, only the dreaded monomorphism restriction prevents h from inheriting this trait. If you set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction, your second code box works fine. –  leftaroundabout Feb 14 '13 at 10:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I found the solution: using the forall quantifier like so:

{-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-}
f :: Int -> (forall a. Num a=> a -> a) -> (Rational, Integer)
f b g = (h (toRational b)
        ,h (toInteger b))
    where h :: Num a => a -> a
          h = g

Which of course can be turned into:

f :: Int -> (forall a. Num a=>a -> a) -> (Rational, Integer)
f b g = (g (toRational b)
        ,g (toInteger b))
share|improve this answer
11  
This is exactly right. Without the forall Haskell will try to specialize the function argument within the function body. This leads to the unsolvable system (Rational ~ a) && (Integer ~ a). The forall binding says that you're going to pass in an unspecialized function and specialize it only at the call site. The downside is that you can't pass another a type in and be sure it matches the function—not that you would do that in this situation. –  J. Abrahamson Feb 14 '13 at 0:43

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