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I'm trying to understand usage of collection in C# and also doing practice on how to define classes base on a statement given in msdn example since its class is not posted and left to reader. I came up with following classes but need to know if it this is right or wrong:

Statement says:

    // ListLeagueList is a list of League objects. 
    // Each League object has a Name and a collection of Division objects. 
    // Each Division has a Name and a collection of Team objects, 
    // and each Team object has a Name.



public class Team
{
    private string teamName;
    public string TeamName
    {
        get { return teamName; }
        set { teamName = value; }
    }
}

public class Division
{
    private string name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }
    }

    public List<Team> DivisionList;
}


public class League
{
    private string Name;
    public string name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }
    }

    List<Division> DivisionList;
}

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Keith Nicholas, Brian Rasmussen, Daniel Kelley, SztupY, Mark Hurd Feb 14 '13 at 11:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
whats the question? – Keith Nicholas Feb 14 '13 at 1:01
    
Seems right to me... – kufudo Feb 14 '13 at 1:02
    
Is the structure of classes right? or wrong? if yes, is there a better way to do it? – amit kohan Feb 14 '13 at 1:02
1  
This is not a question, but if you want to know it's right, except for the fact that Collections should never be null, therefore you should change your List fields to properties and make sure they're never null. – HighCore Feb 14 '13 at 1:04
    
@HighCore I went over the URL you referred but not sure what would be the case of public static readonly List<Team> TeamList = new List<Team>(); can you give me an example on this? – amit kohan Feb 14 '13 at 1:39
up vote 2 down vote accepted

That appears correct, however you've named a List<Team> as DivisionList.. I would change it to TeamList:

public class Division
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public List<Team> TeamList { get; set; } // Change this, because its a List of Teams.
}

EDIT:

gilly beat me to the shorthand properties :$

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for heads up! – amit kohan Feb 14 '13 at 1:18

You can shorten your property definitions by using Auto-Implemented Properties:

public string Name { get; set; }

This way, you don't need the backing field. If, later on, you need to use a backing field for some reason, add it in at that time.

share|improve this answer
    
Good to know Thanks! – amit kohan Feb 14 '13 at 1:19

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