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I'm just learning python, and seem to be making a trivial mistake. With this code, the use of the constructor to Patterns gets and error.

" cit_ref = Patterns( patstring, 3) TypeError: this constructor takes no arguments"

import re

class Patterns:
    """A simple struct to hold our regex """
def __init__(self, pat, bodynumArg=2):
    self.pat = pat
    self.bodynum = bodynumArg
    self.reg = re.compile(self.pat, re.M+re.S)

patstring = r'<((us-)?references-cited)>(.*?)</\1>'
cit_ref = Patterns( patstring, 3)
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2  
Is this your actual indentation? __init__ is not indented to the correct level. –  mVChr Feb 14 '13 at 1:38
    
Barring indentation problems, I can't see anything wrong. Can you post the full traceback? –  mgilson Feb 14 '13 at 1:39
1  
Yes, that is the real code. I didn't realize that the init was expected to be indented. Still getting used to pythons use of indenting instead of {} Thanks –  fishtoprecords Feb 14 '13 at 1:46
1  
@fishtoprecords: If you were defining a class in Java or C++ or whatever you're used to, wouldn't you indent the methods inside the {}? –  abarnert Feb 14 '13 at 1:52
    
@aba, actually, no. I don't like indenting the outer level methods and member variables. I try to keep short line lengths and so I'm used to not indenting the first level. Just a personal quirk. –  fishtoprecords Feb 14 '13 at 2:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You just need to indent your __init__ function so that it is under class Patterns. Like this:

import re

class Patterns:
    """A simple struct to hold our regex """
    def __init__(self, pat, bodynumArg=2):
        self.pat = pat
        self.bodynum = bodynumArg
        self.reg = re.compile(self.pat, re.M+re.S)

patstring = r'<((us-)?references-cited)>(.*?)</\1>'
cit_ref = Patterns( patstring, 3)

In Python, indents do basically the same thing that brackets/braces do in other languages- they delimit code, so you have to be careful with your indentation.

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2  
No wonder it looked right -- I just assumed OP was having trouble with SO markup as so many people do. It's funny that a class without the docstring would have made the error much more obvious. –  mgilson Feb 14 '13 at 1:42
    
@mgilson Yeah, I started to do an edit but then realized that things before and after the init block were indented correctly with markdown. –  Matthew Adams Feb 14 '13 at 1:43
2  
I suppose that's why there are so many people around here who hold to the "Never edit code in a question" position :) –  mgilson Feb 14 '13 at 1:44
    
Thanks, I've mostly got cutting and pasting into SO from all my Java questions. This indent thing will take time to sink in. –  fishtoprecords Feb 14 '13 at 1:47
    
@fishtoprecords It can seem odd at first, but then it starts being nice, IMO. Basically whenever you want to use {}, just indent another level instead, and you should be good to go. –  Matthew Adams Feb 14 '13 at 1:50

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