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I thought NOT IN behaves the same as != in a query. But a query using != returns more rows than a query using NOT IN:

SELECT  count(A.NO)
FROM A
WHERE
A.CODE != 'a' 
AND 
A.CODE  != 'b'
AND
A.CODE  != 'c'
AND 
A.NAME  != 'd' 
AND
A.NAME  != 'e'

returns 1566 rows, whereas

SELECT  count(A.NO)
FROM A
WHERE
A.CODE NOT IN ('a','b','c')
AND
A.NAME NOT IN ('d','e') 

returns only 1200 rows.

I suppose NOT IN excludes NULL values - would that be the only difference?

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2  
can you provide us with some demo data –  Akash Feb 14 '13 at 2:09
2  
If A.CODE or A.NAME has a NULL value, its ignored too in the WHERE clause –  Akash Feb 14 '13 at 2:10
2  
The easiest way to answer the question, is to print out the 366 rows that are in the first query but not in the second. Look at the values for A.CODE and A.NAME. –  byteherder Feb 14 '13 at 2:21
    
NO there is no role of null values –  sandeepKumar Feb 14 '13 at 3:36
    
I can't reproduce your case. please post a test case. or just do a minus between first set of rows and second as @byteherder suggested. –  Florin Ghita Feb 14 '13 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

I have tried to replecate the problem using this simplified SQL fiddle, however, it returns the same number for both versions.

What is differant about your data?

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I'm guessing the queries were slightly different -- most likely different in the column passed to the count() function. –  Colin 't Hart May 7 '13 at 15:29

No answer but what delivers the following?

SELECT *
FROM A
WHERE
A.CODE != 'a' 
AND 
A.CODE  != 'b'
AND
A.CODE  != 'c'
AND 
A.NAME  != 'd' 
AND
A.NAME  != 'e'
AND NOT (
    A.CODE NOT IN ('a','b','c')
    AND
    A.NAME NOT IN ('d','e') 
)
LIMIT 0, 20
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