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The assemblyinfo.cs file has the AssemblyVersion attribute, but when I run the following:

Attribute[] y = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetCustomAttributes();

I get:

System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComVisibleAttribute
System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeCompatibilityAttribute
System.Runtime.CompilerServices.CompilationRelaxationsAttribute
System.Runtime.InteropServices.GuidAttribute

System.Diagnostics.DebuggableAttribute

System.Reflection.AssemblyTrademarkAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyCopyrightAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyCompanyAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyConfigurationAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyFileVersionAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyProductAttribute
System.Reflection.AssemblyDescriptionAttribute

and yet I have checked countless times that this attribute is present in my code:

 [assembly: AssemblyVersion("5.5.5.5")]

...and if I try to access it directly I get an exception:

Attribute x = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly(), typeof(AssemblyVersionAttribute)); //exception

I guess I won't be able to use that attribute, but how come .NET isn't reading it?

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What are you trying to do? Assembly already has a Version property. –  ashes999 Feb 14 '13 at 2:17
    
are you sure? I see neither a static nor instance property with that name –  John Smith Feb 14 '13 at 2:21
1  
You will have to use GetName() example var y = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version; –  sa_ddam213 Feb 14 '13 at 2:26
2  
[AssemblyVersion] is a really big deal in .NET. The compiler treats the attribute specially, it uses it when it generates the metadata of the assembly. And doesn't actually emit the attribute, that would be doing it twice. Use the AssemblyName.Version instead, as shown. –  Hans Passant Feb 14 '13 at 2:39
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3 Answers

If you're trying to just get the assembly version, it's pretty straight forward:

Console.WriteLine("The version of the currently executing assembly is: {0}", Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version);

The property is a type of System.Version, which has Major, Minor, Build, and Revision properties.

Eg. an assembly of version 1.2.3.4 has:

  • Major = 1
  • Minor = 2
  • Build = 3
  • Revision = 4
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I will repeat Hans Passant's comment:

[AssemblyVersion] is a really big deal in .NET. The compiler treats the attribute specially, it uses it when it generates the metadata of the assembly. And doesn't actually emit the attribute, that would be doing it twice. Use the AssemblyName.Version instead, as shown.

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(just to round out the flavors of getting a version...)

If you're trying to get file version info on an arbitrary assembly (i.e., not one loaded/running), you can use FileVersionInfo - however, note that this may not be the same AssemblyVersion specified in the metadata:

var filePath = @"c:\path-to-assembly-file";
FileVersionInfo info = FileVersionInfo.GetVersionInfo(filePath);

// the following two statements are roughly equivalent
Console.WriteLine(info.FileVersion);
Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0}.{1}.{2}.{3}", 
         info.FileMajorPart, 
         info.FileMinorPart, 
         info.FileBuildPart, 
         info.FilePrivatePart));
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That's [AssemblyFileVersion]. –  Hans Passant Feb 14 '13 at 2:40
    
@HansPassant Ah, good point; there is a potential distinction between file version and the "assembly" version gotten via reflection...although one could argue they should be the same... :) –  JerKimball Feb 14 '13 at 2:44
2  
@JerKimball i'd disagree about them needing to be the same. Fileversion causes no binding differences for an assembly, if you have a signed assembly and need to keep things working the same, you can increment your Fileversion and still allow older projects to work with "fixed" assembly (with the same assembly version) –  Paul Farry Feb 14 '13 at 4:51
    
@PaulFarry Actually, that's a very good point. You've sold me; I rescind my stance...well, whatever the opposite of what I implied was. –  JerKimball Feb 14 '13 at 5:28
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