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I would like to determine the exit status of the process during the shutdown hook runtime.

I want to have a logic which is based on the status code (0 or nonzero)

(ex: if zero do nothing else nonzero send an alert email)

Do you know how I can get this information?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I tried to override the SecurityManager checkExit(int status) method - this works if System.exit(status) is called anywhere explicitly - however, it doesn't set the status when the application exits "normally" (no active threads), or an error kills the VM.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.security.Permission;


public class ExitChecker {

    public ExitChecker() {

    	System.setSecurityManager(new ExitMonitorSecurityManager());

    	Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread(new MyShutdownHook()));

    	BufferedReader input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    	String line = "";
    	while (!line.equalsIgnoreCase("Q")) {
    		try {
    			System.out.println("Press a number to exit with that status.");
    			System.out.println("Press 'R' to generate a RuntimeException.");
    			System.out.println("Press 'O' to generate an OutOfMemoryError.");
    			System.out.println("Press 'Q' to exit normally.");
    			line = input.readLine().trim();

    			processInput(line);
    		} catch (IOException e) {
    			e.printStackTrace();
    			System.exit(-1);
    		}
    	}
    }

    private void processInput(String line) {
    	if (line.equalsIgnoreCase("Q")) {
    		// continue, will exit loop and exit normally
    	} else if (line.equalsIgnoreCase("R")) {
    		throwRuntimeException();
    	} else if (line.equals("O")) {
    		throwError();
    	} else {
    		// try to parse to number
    		try {
    			int status = Integer.parseInt(line);
    			callExit(status);
    		} catch(NumberFormatException x) {
    			// not a number.. repeat question...
    			System.out.println("\nUnrecognized input...\n\n");
    		}
    	}
    }

    public void callExit(int status) {
    	System.exit(status);
    }

    public void throwError() {
    	throw new OutOfMemoryError("OutOfMemoryError");
    }

    public void throwRuntimeException() {
    	throw new RuntimeException("Runtime Exception");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	new ExitChecker();
    }

    private static class ExitMonitorSecurityManager extends SecurityManager {

    	@Override
    	public void checkPermission(Permission perm) {
    		//System.out.println(perm.getName());
    		//System.out.println(perm.getActions());
    	}

    	@Override
    	public void checkPermission(Permission perm, Object context) {
    		//System.out.println(perm.getName());
    		//System.out.println(perm.getActions());
    	}

    	@Override
    	public void checkExit(int status) {
    		System.out.println("Setting exit value via security manager...");
    		MyShutdownHook.EXIT_STATUS = status;
    	}
    }

    private static class MyShutdownHook implements Runnable {

    	public static Integer EXIT_STATUS;

    	public void run() {

    		System.out.println("In MyShutdownHook - exit status is " + EXIT_STATUS);
    	}
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Here is some example code whereby a dedicated class is used to initiate a System.exit call via a call to doExit(int). The class also stores the exit status and subsequently acts as a shut-down hook.

public class ShutDownHook implements Runnable {
  private volatile Integer exitStatus;

  // Centralise all System.exit code under control of this class.
  public void doExit(int exitStatus) {
    this.exitStatus = exitStatus;
    System.exit(exitStatus); // Will invoke run.
  }

  public void run() {
    // Verify that an exit status has been supplied.
    // (Application could have called System.exit(int) directly.)
    if (this.exitStatus != null) {
      switch(exitStatus) {
        case 0: // Process based on exit status.
        // Yada yada ...
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes wrapping the exit method and using it accross the application code is one option but not the best! I was expecting a exitStatus property which is provided by the java sdk though it seems its not available. – Kostas Sep 28 '09 at 13:18

Why do this in the application itsellf? If your application is not sending a e-mails as part of normal operations, incorporating this kind of functionality is not a good idea, IMHO.

I would just trust to setting an appropriate return value from the JVM process and let a shell script or whatever take care of the conditional creation of the e-mail.

Shutdownhooks are supposed to run for a short time only, sending an e-mail could consume quite some time.

share|improve this answer
    
I do agree. This condition should be out of the application codebase and something external could take care of the email alert. The application runs on a NT box as a service using tanuki wrapper community edition. The wrapper provide email notifications but only in its paid version. Are you aware of a free/open sourced configuration that could manage email notifications? – Kostas Sep 28 '09 at 13:16

You must save the exit status in main into a global (public static) variable.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why specifically a public static variable in main? Couldn't the exit status be passed to the object acting as the shut-down hook prior to calling System.exit? – Adamski Sep 28 '09 at 12:20
    
The global variable is just the most simple solution. – Aaron Digulla Sep 28 '09 at 12:52

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