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Trying to exercise my understanding of concurrency in Java, here's the problem: There can be multiple threads running method A and only one thread running method B (lets say when A() has run for 10 times. So on the 10th time, that thread will run method B. When this happens, it must block threads from running A and allow threads that are already running A complete before running the rest of B. Also, the threads in A shouldn't wait on itself.

edit: All threads are started on A first, there is an outside method that checks when to run B.

My attempt so far looks something like this:

volatile Boolean lock = false; //false = threads in method A allowed to run, thread in method B otherwise
volatile Integer countOfA = 0;

void A(){
    boolean continue = false;
    synchronized(lock){
    if(lock == true){ //there is a thread in B, block threads in A
        lock.wait();

        increaseCountOfA();
        //do work
        decreaseCountOfA();

        if(countOfA == 0){ //this was the last thread that ran with lock
            lock = true;
            lock.notify(); //only the thread in B should be waiting on this
        }
      }else{
        continue = true;
      }
    }

    if(continue){
        increaseCountOfA();
        //do work;
        decreaseCountOfA();
    }
}

void B(){
  synchronized(lock){
    if(lock == false){
        lock.wait();
        if(countOfA > 0){
            countOfA.wait();
        }
        //do work;
        lock = false;
        lock.notifyAll();
    }
  }
}

void increaseCountOfA(){
  synchronized(countOfA){
    countOfA++;
  }
}

void decreaseCountOfA(){
  synchronized(countOfA){
    countOfA--;
  }
}

When its ran, it hangs. I'm suspecting a deadlock also I don't know how many levels of synchronization is needed for this problem. Can this be done with just one level?

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1  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not thing that with this code the vairable 'lock' ever get's to be set to true, so probably all your threads are waiting on it. –  Belov Feb 14 '13 at 3:41
    
Yes, you are right. Initialized it to true but its behavior is still unchanged. –  user1203349 Feb 14 '13 at 3:49
    
@Belov Actually, lock is meant to be false at first to allow threads to do work in A first, notice the else in A(). –  user1203349 Feb 14 '13 at 4:00
    
I know it is init to false, and is sup to be, but I think you should change it to true I'd guess somewhere in the B() method. At the moment you are putting lock=true in the if(lock==true) statement only and since lock is init to false it never changes. –  Belov Feb 14 '13 at 10:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you do synchronized(lock) you are synchronizing on the object referred to by lock, not on the variable. You probably want an independent lock object whose value you are not changing. Alternately, you might consider using a higher-level concurrency class like Semaphore.

In this case, you have one thread waiting on Boolean.TRUE, and another posting a notify on Boolean.FALSE.

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wouldn't having a constant object for lock make the threads in A execute sequentially since they're all synchronized on it? Those synchronized blocks probably shouldn't be that big to begin with. –  user1203349 Feb 14 '13 at 4:21
    
All of your thread A's will wait on the lock. Since wait() releases the monitor, as soon as one thread waits the others are free to enter the synchronized block. Then notify() is never called because all the thread A's are blocked, and thread B calls notify() only if lock is somehow false. –  Russell Zahniser Feb 14 '13 at 4:27

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